Tenant Based Rental Assistance Available for Covid-19 in Placer County

Rental subsidies are now available to very low-income individuals and families in Placer County that were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and meet the program criteria (excluding the City of Roseville).

Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) offers assistance for up to four months of unpaid back rent and late fees accrued after March 13, 2020 (not to exceed $2,500).

The program is scheduled to END on December 31st and is limited to funds available!

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Must be income eligible for the program (see flyer for specifics)
  • Must currently be renting or leasing a unit in Placer County (excluding Roseville City Limits) pursuant to a written rental agreement
  • Owner of the unit must be willing to enter into a rental assistance agreement with Placer County through the TBRA Program
  • At least of one of the following criteria must be met:
    • The household includes a member that has tested positive for COVID-19 and must quarantine so the wage earner(s) are unable to attend work
    • The household has experienced a documented decrease in total gross monthly household income of at least 30% because of the pandemic
    • The household has experienced a documented loss of income due to the pandemic and is behind or falling behind on rent

Interested renters should contact 211 for screening by dialing 2-1-1 or 1-833-DIAL211. 

211 Placer operators will go through a screening sheet to determine if the household is potentially eligible. All households that pass the screening will be referred over to Placer County and eligible applicants will be sent the TBRA Application to apply for assistance.

Placer County Moves to the “Red Tier”

The State of California moved Placer County into the State’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy ‘red’ tier – further easing restrictions in the county. Sectors that can open indoors with modifications include restaurants, places of worship, gyms and fitness centers, movie theaters and personal care services.

The full list of sectors refer to: https://covid19.ca.gov/safer-economy/

For a summary of which activities are allowed at each tier, see: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/CDPH%20Document%20Library/COVID-19/Dimmer-Framework-August_2020.pdf

End of Placer County Local Health Emergency

In addition, the Placer County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a resolution declaring the end of Placer County’s local health emergency on Tuesday, September 8.

Since the board’s ratification of the local health emergency March 9, the county has and will continue to work diligently to manage local disease spread – sharing community health information; reporting COVID-19 case dynamics at board meetings; providing a COVID-19 dashboard for community reference; addressing the needs of vulnerable populations; and clarifying state guidance so local businesses can reopen responsibly and consistent with state public health orders and safety protocols.

While acknowledging that California’s state of emergency and Department of Public Health orders, directives and guidance remain in full effect in Placer County, the resolution expresses the board’s concerns that the state framework for measuring COVID-19 mischaracterizes the current state of disease specifically in Placer County and harms the community’s economic, health, mental and social well-being. 

For more information, see: https://www.placer.ca.gov/6818/Placer-declares-end-of-COVID-19-health-e

Applications for Placer Shares Grant Funding Now Open!

Beginning Aug. 25, eligible small businesses and non-profit organizations in Placer County can begin applying for Placer Shares grant funding to offset impacts caused by the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting state shutdown order. 

The grant program is made possible by the Placer County Board of Supervisors who directed that 20% of the $40 million from CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security) Act funding be set aside to help small businesses and nonprofits, the largest percentage of any county in the state.

Supplemental grant assistance for non-profits will be administered by the Placer and Tahoe-Truckee Community Foundations.

“Placer County is committed to supporting our local businesses and nonprofits impacted during this economic crisis,” said Board Chair Bonnie Gore. “That is why the county is diverting 20% of our CARES funding, more than any other county in California, to support business and nonprofits, helping them stay open. We are a strong and resilient community. Our Board stands firm to support our local economy with everything we’ve got.”

The grant program, which will be based on need, could provide awards of up to $10,000 to cover eligible COVID-19 expenses, identified by United States Treasury guidance.

Grant applications will be accepted online Aug. 25 – Sept. 7 on the Placer Shares website.

Placer Shares: Eats & Drinks

In addition, the Placer County Board of Supervisors approved an additional $1.2 million in grant funding to assist restaurants and bars impacted by COVID-19 in the county. 

Eligible restaurants and bars may begin applying for $1,000 in grant funding via the newly established Placer Shares: Eats & Drinks program. 

“This pandemic has been devastating to our entire community, especially restaurants and bars,” said Placer County Board of Supervisors Chair Bonnie Gore. “The Eats & Drinks program is just one example of Placer’s commitment to help business sectors hardest hit by COVID-19.”

Grant applications will be accepted online beginning Aug. 21 at http://www.placer.ca.gov/eatsdrinks, and must be received by Sept. 30

The Board of Supervisors voted to offer fee relief for restaurants and bars who had paid their annual county inspection fees but were ordered to close by the state due to COVID-19.

Placer Shares, Eats & Drinks grant funding is separate from the Placer Shares $8 million grant fund.

Eligible restaurants and bars may apply for both Eats & Drinks and Placer Shares programs.

NCPH Announces Second COVID-19 Related Death in Nevada County

Nevada County Public Health is reporting the second Nevada County death related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The person was an elderly Western Nevada County resident who recently became ill with COVID-19. This death is not associated with a skilled nursing facility or assisted living facility.
“Our thoughts are with the family, friends and loved ones of the deceased,” said Dr. Rick Johnson, Nevada County’s Interim Health Officer. “This is a tragic reminder of the seriousness of COVID-19, and reminder of the need to take extra precautions in order to protect those who are most vulnerable to developing a serious illness as a result of this disease.”
Out of respect for the privacy of the family, Nevada County Public Health is not sharing any further details.
For additional information on COVID-19 and what you can do to mitigate its spread, please visit Nevada County’s novel coronavirus webpage at www.mynevadacounty.com/coronavirus.

OES Seeks Feedback on CodeRED Emergency Alert Test

CodeRED_Survey-Sq-v2

August 12, 2020, the Office of Emergency Services conducted a test of Nevada County’s CodeRED Emergency Alert System and they seek your feedback. Share your experience by completing the emergency alert test Community Survey!

Feedback is requested whether or not you received an alert. Complete the survey here: ReadyNevadaCounty.org/EmergencyAlertSurvey

More than 150 surveys have already been submitted providing valuable information about the emergency alert test. Many residents shared that the alert appeared to be a sales or spam call due to an automated announcement preceding the notification. The Office of Emergency Services has taken steps to prevent this from happening in the future. Moving forward, alerts will begin with a recording of a human voice that will state, “CodeRED Emergency Alerts from County of Nevada“. 

211 Nevada County received over 40 CodeRED sign-ups on the day of the test. Normally 211 signs up 60-80 new users in a month.

Find Helpful Quick Links Below:

Countywide Test of Emergency Alert Systems Scheduled for August 12

On August 12, the County of Nevada Office of Emergency Services and the Town of Truckee are teaming up to issue simultaneous tests of the CodeRED and Nixle Everbridge Emergency Alert Systems. 

All Nevada County residents are advised to prepare by registering for CodeRED Emergency Alerts in one of the following ways:

CodeRED Emergency Alerts will display as originating from 866-419-5000 or 855-969-4636 on caller ID and Residents are encouraged to save these numbers.

The Town of Truckee will conduct a concurrent test of the Nixle Everbridge Emergency Alert System which serves Town of Truckee residents. Truckee residents are encouraged to register for Nixle emergency alerts, in addition to CodeRED, which serves unincorporated Eastern Nevada County, and all Western Nevada County. Truckee Police Department and Truckee Fire Protection District utilize the Nixle Everbridge Emergency Alert System as the primary method of communication during critical incidents. Both residents and visitors are encouraged to subscribe to stay informed in the event of an emergency. 

Residents are encouraged to utilize the user-friendly Nixle Everbridge application on mobile devices. Simply text “APP” to 888-777 to receive a link to download the Everbridge Mobile Application. Complete your registration by downloading, installing and opening the app. Insert 96161 to subscribe to the Truckee Police Department and Truckee Fire Protection District. 

Both CodeRED and Nixle Everbridge are high-speed mass notification systems designed to notify residents in the event of an emergency. Emergency alerts are one of many communication tools utilized by local government in the event of an emergency, and testing these systems is an important part of emergency planning. 

These tools are not a guaranteed source of information, and residents should be prepared and remain situationally aware.

Learn more at ReadyNevadaCounty.org

Grass Valley & Truckee Small Business PPE Distribution Success

In just 6 days, approximately 1,300 gallons of hand sanitizer and 314,000 surgical masks were given to more than 1,000 small businesses from Truckee to Penn Valley. The Nevada County spirit was on full display as volunteers from civic organizations, athletic clubs, service groups, chambers of commerce, special districts and local agencies banded together to support the Office of Emergency Services in providing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to small businesses and non-profit organizations. In total, 170 volunteers ranging from teens to retirees and representing more than 20 organizations helped during the distribution period.

“I feel so much more secure knowing that we’ve got a stash of supplies that we can freely hand out without penny-pinching and withholding from our staff…We’re well set up so that no matter what comes in the future, we won’t get caught like we did in March where there just wasn’t anything
available. Thank you so much for getting us well-positioned for whatever the next few months hold for us. It’s really helpful to have those extra supplies. Thank you, thank you, thank you,” says Holly Verbeck from Hey Chef who received supplies in Truckee.

In addition to the PPE that was made available through the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (CalOES) in collaboration with the Office of the Small Business Advocate (CalOSBA), small businesses were able to get evacuation tags and emergency planning materials from the county Office of Emergency Services and the Sheriff’s Office. In Truckee, businesses received information on how to complete the 2020 Census, and educational community resource pamphlets and flyers.

“With limited in-person outreach this summer, we felt it was a valuable opportunity to share tools to help Nevada County get ready for the possibility of a wildfire or Public Safety Power Shutoff,” said Jenn Tamo, Senior Administrative Analyst with Office of Emergency Services, who helped coordinate the effort. “It was wonderful to be reminded of how our community comes together during challenging times. This truly could not have happened without the incredible assistance from volunteers and organizations like 211 with their Volunteer Hub that mobilized quickly to bring everyone together,” she adds.

As a bonus, South Fork Vodka was inspired to add a donation of 300 gallons of hand sanitizer in various sizes to the donation bounty. “They were working alongside us at both locations on the distribution days. There are so many people and organizations to thank. We could not have done this without them, or the generous donations of bags from Grocery Outlet, Mountain Hardware, Raley’s O-N-E Market, SPD Market, and Connecting Point,” adds Courtney Henderson, who coordinated the distribution effort in Truckee.

In addition to the 170 volunteers who made this event possible, of special note, the County Office of Emergency Services would like to thank the following partners:

Cal Office of Emergency Services
California Census 2020
Connecting Point
Economic Resource Council
Grass Valley Chamber of Commerce
Grass Valley Downtown Association
NC TECH
Nevada City Chamber of Commerce
Nevada County Association of Realtors
Nevada Union Athletics
Rotary International
Sierra Business Council
SPD Market
Tahoe Truckee Community Foundation
The Center for the Arts
Town of Truckee
Truckee Chamber of Commerce
Truckee Downtown Merchants Association
Truckee Tahoe Airport Community Partner
Truckee Welcome Center
Truckee-Donner Recreation & Park District

State Closes Bars, Indoor Operations of Restaurants, Wineries, Theaters

Today, Governor Newsom and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced additional statewide closures that impact Nevada and Placer County business operations.

What is closing statewide and in Nevada and Placer Counties: Due to the current rates of disease transmission and the increase in hospitalization and ICU utilization, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) has announced a statewide closure of the following operations:

  • Dine-in Restaurants (indoor closed; to-go, delivery, curbside and outdoor seating with distancing allowed.)
  • Wineries and Tasting Rooms (indoor closed; outdoor seating with distancing allowed)
  • Movie Theater (indoor closed)
  • Family Entertainment Centers (indoor closed)
  • Zoos and Museums (indoor closed)
  • Cardrooms (indoor closed)
  • Brewpubs, breweries, bars, and pubs (indoor and outdoor closed unless an exception below applies):
    • Bars, pubs, brewpubs, and breweries, may operate outdoors if they are offering sit-down, outdoor, dine-in meals. Alcohol can be sold only in the same transaction as a meal. When operating outdoors, they must follow the dine-in restaurant guidance and should continue to encourage takeout and delivery service whenever possible.
    • Bars, pubs, brewpubs, and breweries that do not provide sit-down meals themselves, but can contract with another vendor to do so, can serve dine-in meals when operating outdoors provided both businesses follow the dine-in restaurant guidance and alcohol is sold only in the same transaction as a meal.
    • Venues that are currently authorized to provide off sale beer, wine, and spirits to be consumed off premises and do not offer sit-down, dine-in meals must follow the guidance for retail operations and offer curbside sales only.
    • Concert, performance, or entertainment venues must remain closed until they are allowed to resume modified or full operation through a specific reopening order or guidance. Establishments that serve full meals must discontinue this type of entertainment until these types of activities are allowed to resume modified or full operation.

Under the statewide order, this remains in effect until further notice.

What is closing in Placer County only?
Placer County is currently on the State’s County Monitoring List. Additional closures of indoor operations are mandated. Those indoor operations include the following:

  • Gyms and Fitness Centers
  • Places of Worship
  • Indoor Protests
  • Offices for Non-Critical Infrastructure Sectors as identified at covid19.ca.gov 
  • Personal Care Services (including nail salons, massage parlors, and tattoo parlors)
  • Hair Salons and Barbershops
  • Malls

Outdoor operations, however, may be conducted if a business can do so while still taking all infection control measures and while wearing face coverings.

To continue to support our local businesses and to protect our community’s vulnerable populations, it is important to continue to follow Public Health recommendations for slowing the spread of COVID-19:

  • Do not gather with others outside your household. Many of the recent COVID-19 cases in Nevada County have been as a result of social gatherings and the mixing of households.
  • Wear a face covering when in public.
  • Wash your hands frequently and avoid touching your face.

Keep your physical distancing of 6 feet or more when in public spaces or with people from outside your household.

State Orders Some Placer County Businesses to Close Beginning July 12th

In response to the increasing spread of COVID-19, State Public Health Officer Dr. Sonia Angell today issued an order for several businesses in Placer County to either close or eliminate indoor operations starting Sunday, July 12. The State had indicated previously that any California county that remains on the monitoring list for three days will be ordered to draw back its reopening efforts.

According to the State order, the following businesses must shift to outdoor operations or close effective on Sunday for a minimum of three weeks.

  • Dine-in restaurants
  • Wineries and Tasting Rooms
  • Family Entertainment Centers
  • Movie Theaters
  • Zoos and Museums
  • Cardrooms

The State order allows businesses to modify operations to provide services outside and encourages take-out and delivery. The state has also issued new guidance for restaurants providing outdoor dining, take-out, drive-through, and delivery. All industry or sector guidance documents that have been issued by the State to date, including all infectious control measures outlined in those guidance documents, apply in outdoor settings and must be adhered to, according to the state order.

In addition, all brewpubs, breweries, bars, and pubs must close, both indoors and outdoors, unless they are offering sit down, dine-in meals as described in earlier state guidance.

Drivers of increased disease transmission in Placer County include large households where staying away from others while ill is difficult, community and extended family gatherings, and indoor work environments where physical distancing is difficult. The rising number of cases of COVID-19 in Placer County as well as neighboring Sacramento County is in turn driving an increase in hospitalizations.

“I understand how frustrating this is for our local businesses, and my hope is that our whole community will pull together and promote the personal precautions that can help reverse these disease trends,” said Placer County Health Officer Dr. Aimee Sisson. “Please wash your hands, maintain physical distance, wear a face covering in public, and do not gather with non-household members.”

NC Public Health: Help Limit Spread of COVID-19 Over Holiday Weekend


Summer is officially here in Nevada County. As residents prepare to celebrate the Fourth of July weekend, Nevada County Public Health reminds residents to follow best practices for reducing the spread of COVID-19, including washing hands regularly, practicing physical distancing of at least six feet, staying home if you’re feeling sick, wearing a face covering (required in public), disinfecting high-touch surfaces and practicing good hygiene.

Gatherings with family and friends have long been a part of traditional Fourth of July celebrations, but this year is different. Gatherings between people from different households are still not allowed under the statewide Stay-at-Home Order.

 “As we see the number of cases go up steadily in our community and statewide, we ask that everyone take these restrictions on gatherings seriously,” said Director of Nevada County Public Health Jill Blake. “Our ability to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Nevada County relies on everyone doing their part and following current public health guidance.”

Since June 1, the county has seen the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases nearly triple, from 42 at the beginning of the month to 116 on June 30. Both sides of the county have seen significant increases, which mirrors surges in adjacent counties and at the state and national level. 

Most of the new cases in Nevada County come directly from informal gatherings between different households that are still not allowed. The county urges residents to do their part to prevent the spread of COVID-19 by not gathering with people outside their household this holiday weekend and following state and local public health guidance.

Masks Make a Difference Fact Sheet in English (Nevada County Public Health): https://www.mynevadacounty.com/DocumentCenter/View/35029/COVID-Face-Coverings-Flyer

Masks Make a Difference Fact Sheet in Spanish (Nevada County Public Health):  https://www.mynevadacounty.com/DocumentCenter/View/35054/COVID-Face-Coverings-Flyer-Espanol

Guidance on Gatherings (Nevada County Public Health): https://www.mynevadacounty.com/DocumentCenter/View/35052/COVID-Gatherings-Flyer

New Public Health Guidance Requires Californians to Wear Face Coverings

The California Department of Public Health today released updated guidance that requires Californians to wear a face covering in high-risk settings. Today’s guidance mandates the use of cloth face coverings by the general public statewide when outside the home, with limited exceptions. 

Californians must wear face coverings when they are in the situations listed below:

  • Inside of, or in line to enter, any indoor public space;
  • Obtaining services from the healthcare sector in settings including, but not limited to, a hospital, pharmacy, medical clinic, laboratory, physician or dental office, veterinary clinic, or blood bank;
  • Waiting for or riding on public transportation or paratransit or while in a taxi, private car service, or ride-sharing vehicle;
  • Engaged in work, whether at the workplace or performing work off-site, when:
  • Interacting in-person with any member of the public; 
  • Working in any space visited by members of the public, regardless of whether anyone from the public is present at the time; 
  • Working in any space where food is prepared or packaged for sale or distribution to others; 
  • Working in or walking through common areas, such as hallways, stairways, elevators, and parking facilities; 
  • In any room or enclosed area where other people (except for members of the person’s own household or residence) are present when unable to physically distance.

The following individuals are exempt from wearing a face covering:

  • Children aged two and under;
  • Persons with a medical, mental health, or developmental disability that prevents wearing a face covering;
  • Persons who are hearing impaired, or communicating with a person who is hearing impaired, where the ability to see the mouth is essential for communication;
  • Persons for whom wearing a face covering would create a risk to the person related to their work, as determined by local, state, or federal regulators or workplace safety guidelines. 
  • Persons who are obtaining a service involving the nose or face for which temporary removal of the face covering is necessary to perform the service;
  • Persons who are seated at a restaurant or other establishment that offers food or beverage service, while they are eating or drinking, provided that they are able to maintain a distance of at least six feet away from persons who are not members of the same household or residence;
  • Persons who are engaged in outdoor work or recreation such as swimming, walking, hiking, bicycling, or running, when alone or with household members, and when they are able to maintain a distance of at least six feet from others;
  • Persons who are incarcerated. Prisons and jails, as part of their mitigation plans, will have specific guidance on the wearing of face coverings of masks for both inmates and staff.”

“Science shows that face coverings and masks work,” said Governor Gavin Newsom. “They are critical to keeping those who are around you safe, keeping businesses open and restarting our economy.”

Governor Newsom also addressed why he took this action now. “Simply put, we are seeing too many people with faces uncovered – putting at risk the real progress we have made in fighting the disease. California’s strategy to restart the economy and get people back to work will only be successful if people act safely and follow health recommendations. That means wearing a face covering, washing your hands and practicing physical distancing.”

More information is available on the CDPH website.

Stage 3 Businesses May Reopen with Modifications on June 12th

Nevada County Public Health has updated Nevada County’s Reopen Plan for the safe reopening of 12 new industry sectors in Nevada County beginning on June 12th, which includes statewide guidance and guidance for variance counties like Nevada County. Updated FAQs are also available on the statewide Stay-at-Home order and reopening Nevada County.

Nevada County Public Health Officer Dr. Ken Cutler has rescinded the local Short-Term Rental and Lodging order effective tomorrow, June 12th, to align with the State’s recommended guidance for reopening these industries safely. All hotels, lodging and short-term rentals must abide by the State’s guidance for this industry.

New sectors/activities that can open IF they can follow the state guidance:

  • Movie theaters
  • Family entertainment centers
  • Wineries and bars
  • Zoos, museums, galleries, aquariums
  • Gyms and fitness centers
  • Hotels and short term rentals for tourism and individual travel
  • Card rooms
  • Campgrounds and outdoor recreation
  • Movie, film, tv production
  • Professional sports (w/o live audiences)

What’s still closed statewide:

  • Personal services, like nail salons, massage, body waxing and tattoo parlors
  • Public events and gatherings, like live audience sports and live theater
  • Team sports that involve contact
  • Convention centers
  • Theme parks and festivals
  • Higher education (in person)
  • Indoor playgrounds, like bounce centers, ball pits and laser tag
  • Saunas and steam rooms

Nevada County is hosting a follow-up Stage 3 Business Guidance Workshop on Tuesday, June 16th. Local Businesses May Submit Reopening Questions to COVID19Recovery@co.nevada.ca.us.

Nevada County Moving into Stage 3 Reopening as Soon as June 12th

On Friday, June 5th, the California Department of Public Health released reopening guidance documents for 12 additional Stage 3 business sectors. Under the statewide order and with local Public Health Officer approval, these businesses will be able to reopen with modifications in place to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 as soon as June 12th. Nevada County Public Health immediately began to review the guidance to determine how these requirements fit into our local community. They will continue a careful review to provide science-based recommendations or requirements for both a safe and quick reopening specific to Nevada County.

“It is good news that we will be able to reopen more businesses and move into Stage 3 reopening as early as next Friday,” said Nevada County Public Health Director Jill Blake. “We will be reviewing the State guidance this weekend and considering how we can best protect our community by moving safely into Stage 3 reopening.  However, with this good news, we also saw a significant spike in Nevada County cases this week. We need to continue to be diligent with reopening safely, and that will truly require a community-wide effort.”

COVID-19 Cases Increases to 48 – Testing Available to All Residents

Nevada County received notification of six new COVID-19 cases today; five of the residents are closely connected with a common exposure, and the sixth was a person who had no symptoms. All are adults residing in Eastern Nevada County. All have been notified and are isolating. In addition, household contacts are in quarantine. The case investigation was initiated by Nevada County Public Health Department today and remains open.Case investigation and contact tracing are core public health functions used to connect with people who are COVID-19 positive so that we can help them get medical care and figure out who they might have exposed without knowing it, so those individuals can be contacted, too.

“Although our hospitals are prepared for a surge in COVID-19 cases, we have case investigation and contact tracing process systems in place and more testing available, COVID-19 remains a risk to our community,” said Public Health Director Jill Blake. “Those who are more at risk for serious illness due to COVID-19 such as the elderly or those with underlying health conditions should continue to stay at home as much as they can as well as limit their exposure to others.”

Testing Available to All Nevada County Residents

Two OptumServe testing sites are available in Grass Valley and Kings Beach. Symptomatic or asymptomatic can be tested. People who get tested at these sites will not be charged for the test; for those with insurance, your insurance will be billed, and for those with no insurance, the State will pay for your test. Increased testing allows for a better understanding of COVID-19 in our community. Even without symptoms, testing of all individuals can help identify those who are asymptomatic and may want to take extra precautions to protect others in the community.

You must pre-register and schedule an appointment at https://www.lhi.care/covidtesting or call 888-634-1123. Please have your appointment authorization number when you arrive at the testing site. Tests can also still be conducted by doctors’ offices too, but you do not need your physician’s approval to be tested at the OptumServe site.

Nevada County Revises Reopen Plan to Include Salons and Barber Shops

The Nevada County Health Officer has revised the Reopen Plan again based on Gov. Gavin Newsom’s May 27th announcement with new information regarding barber shops and salons. By revising this plan and posting it, the Health Officer is authorizing hair salons and barber shops in Nevada County to engage in state approved activities, with modifications, effective immediately.

More information here.

Great Plates Delivered Begins Service in Nevada County

The County of Nevada has launched Great Plates Delivered, a new program to ensure no senior goes hungry in Nevada County during the COVID-19 crisis. Three fresh meals a day will be delivered to those who qualify with the help of three local restaurants, Emily’s Catering, Sergio’s Caffè, and Fudenjüce, fulfilling the 2 purposes of the state-wide plan: help seniors and older adults at high risk from COVID-19 to stay home and stay healthy by delivering three nutritious meals a day; and provide essential economic stimulus to local businesses struggling to stay afloat during the COVID-19 crisis.

Qualifying Nevada County residents meeting the following criteria are encouraged to apply:

  • 65 or older, or 60-64 years of age and high-risk (Individuals who have tested positive for COVID-19 or been exposed to COVID-19 or individuals with certain underlying health conditions that place them at high-risk should they contract the virus)
  • Live alone or with one other Great Plates Delivered Program eligible adult
  • Not be currently receiving assistance from any other state or federal nutrition assistance programs (Meals on Wheels, CalFresh)
  • Earn no more that 600% of the federal poverty limit ($74,940 (single) or $101,460 (2-person)) annually.
  • Affirm an inability to prepare or obtain meals for themselves.

Currently the program is scheduled to run until June 10, however it may be extended by FEMA based on demand.  To be screened and placed on an eligibility list, call 211 Connecting Point by dialing 2-1-1 or 1-833-DIAL211 (1-833-342-5211). Eastern County participants will be referred to Sierra Senior services for enrollment. Those who may not qualify but are in need of food assistance are encouraged to call 211 Connecting Point to get connected to additional resources. 

Nevada County Readiness Plan Approved, Enters Extended Stage 2

Nevada County’s attestation of readiness, or readiness plan, has been approved by the State. Nevada County is still under the statewide Stay-at-Home order, however this means that Nevada County has met the State’s readiness criteria to move further into Stage 2 reopening and reopen more local businesses.

“We are fortunate that we met the criteria to advance through Stage 2 and can now allow for certain businesses to open sooner than they would if they had to move at the pace of the State as a whole, but this should not be viewed as an indication that we are now risk-free,” said Jill Blake, Public Health Director. “In fact, there is a greater responsibility on businesses and customers to work to reduce the risk of disease transmission as we reopen Stage 2 businesses in Nevada County.”

County staff was out in the community today with our Cities, Town and business associations to work with local businesses to prepare to open as quickly as possible and have COVID-19 Prevention Plans in place. Reopening will not look like business as usual pre-COVID pandemic and businesses will need to follow the guidance from the State and County in order to protect their employees and customers. 

As we move forward through Stage 2, Nevada County needs to continue practicing social distancing, good hygiene, wearing face coverings in public, minimizing going into public spaces, and educating friends, family and favorite businesses on the current recommendations.

Reopening Nevada County

With tonight’s approval of Nevada County’s readiness plan from the State, all Stage 2 businesses may reopen with COVID-19 Prevention Plans in place. These include destination retail, office workspaces where teleworking is not possible, outdoor museums and limited personal services such as car washes, dog-grooming and landscaping with protections to limit the spread of COVID-19 as the State continues to modify its Stay at Home order. Statewide guidance for these sectors is available.

The State posted guidance for dine-in restaurants and shopping centers today, as some counties, like Nevada County, have been approved to move further into Stage 2 reopening. More guidance and checklists for local businesses are available at www.mynevadacounty.com/coronavirus/businesses.

Stage 2 Business Reopening Guidance

In order to reduce the level of risk of spreading COVID-19, each business should implement a COVID-19 Prevention Plan, which will address implementing risk mitigating practices in their business to create safe environments for workers and customers.

Businesses with questions about modifying business practices to keep customers safe and slow the spread of COVID-19 can email COVID19recovery@co.nevada.ca.us. General coronavirus questions can be directed to the Coronavirus Call Center at 1-833-DIAL211 or 211@connectingpoint.org.

State Stay-at-Home Order Still in Effect as County Rescinds local Order

Nevada County Public Health Officer, Dr. Ken Cutler, has rescinded Nevada County’s local Stay-at-Home Order which was originally set to expire on May 15, 2020. Nevada County is now under the statewide Order and looking towards meeting the state’s “readiness criteria” that will allow counties to move more quickly through Stage 2. Progress into Stage 2 will continue to be a thoughtful and phased approach to reopening.

“We thank everyone for following the Stay-at-Home Order closely,” said Dr. Ken Cutler. “We are looking forward to working with our local businesses and employers to move safely with the state into Stage 2, but this is not a return to normal yet.”

For frequently asked questions about Nevada County rescinding Nevada County’s Stay-at-Home Order, visit www.mynevadacounty.com/coronavirus.

State Guidelines on Stage 2

The Resilience Roadmap stages that California is using to guide its gradual reopening process are:

  • Stage 1: Safety and Preparedness
  • Stage 2: Lower-Risk Workplaces
  • Stage 3: Higher-Risk Workplaces
  • Stage 4: End of Stay at Home Order

The state has published guidelines for the initial “soft opening” of Stage 2 and the businesses that includes at covid19.ca.gov/roadmap.  All businesses should review the guidance, prepare a plan, and post the checklist for your business industry in your workplace to show customers and employees that you’ve reduced the risk and are open for business. Before reopening, all facilities should:

  1. Perform a detailed risk assessment and implement a site-specific protection plan
  2. Train employees on how to limit the spread of COVID-19, including how to screen themselves for symptoms and stay home if they have them
  3. Implement individual control measures and screenings
  4. Implement disinfecting protocols
  5. Implement physical distancing guidance

The State is all allowing local health jurisdictions that meet the criteria set forth by the California Department of Public Health and follow the process in the Guidance to County governments to move through Stage 2 and reopen more businesses before the State as a whole. The State’s readiness criteria were released yesterday and Nevada County is on track to attest to being prepared to advance through Stage 2 reopenings.

“We are well-positioned and well-prepared to meet the state’s criteria,” said Jill Blake, Public Health Director. “This readiness is due to the hard work and forward thinking of our Public Health team as well as the dedication and preparedness of our local partners including the hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and others who serve vulnerable populations.”

The state is planning to provide additional restaurant industry guidance for this latter part of Stage 2 on Tuesday.

State guidance for Stage 2 businesses

Truckee And Tahoe Officials Cancel Upcoming Fourth Of July Events

Truckee and North Lake Tahoe regional officials have made the tough decision to cancel the annual Fourth of July fireworks shows in Donner Lake, Truckee, and the North Shore of Lake Tahoe. Canceled events include the Fourth of July parade, which encompasses the Firecracker Mile in Historic Downtown Truckee, and any other events that take place through the Fourth of July in Truckee and North Lake Tahoe. Concerts at Commons in Tahoe City and Kings Beach will also be cancelled through the Fourth of July. Events later in the summer are still being planned for at this time.

The decision was made in consultation with area partners including the Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Truckee Chamber of Commerce, North Tahoe Business Association, Tahoe City Downtown Association, North Tahoe Public Utility District and Tahoe City Public Utility District. Uncertainty around the state’s timeline to allow large public gatherings contributed to the decision. The need to implement appropriate safety measures for large-scale events, while also ensuring physical distancing options for participants, were also contributing factors.

The 4th July parade is produced by Truckee Chambers of Commerce in partnership with the Town. Lynn Saunders, President and CEO Truckee Chamber of Commerce acknowledges that, “We know these events are a long-standing tradition and are important to celebrate. They impact our local businesses and support our tourism economy through the many people that visit our area over the 4th of July weekend. This decision was not easy. We look forward to the day when we will be able to safely come together for these fun community events.”

The full press release can be found here.