Countywide Test of Emergency Alert Notification Systems Scheduled for August 12

August 12, the County of Nevada Office of Emergency Services and the Town of Truckee are teaming up to issue simultaneous tests of the CodeRED and Nixle Everbridge Emergency Alert Systems. 

All Nevada County residents are advised to prepare by registering for CodeRED Emergency Alerts in one of the following ways:

CodeRED Emergency Alerts will display as originating from 866-419-5000 or 855-969-4636 on caller ID and Residents are encouraged to save these numbers.

The Town of Truckee will conduct a concurrent test of the Nixle Everbridge Emergency Alert System which serves Town of Truckee residents. Truckee residents are encouraged to register for Nixle emergency alerts, in addition to CodeRED, which serves unincorporated Eastern Nevada County, and all Western Nevada County. Truckee Police Department and Truckee Fire Protection District utilize the Nixle Everbridge Emergency Alert System as the primary method of communication during critical incidents. Both residents and visitors are encouraged to subscribe to stay informed in the event of an emergency. 

Residents are encouraged to utilize the user-friendly Nixle Everbridge application on mobile devices. Simply text “APP” to 888-777 to receive a link to download the Everbridge Mobile Application. Complete your registration by downloading, installing and opening the app. Insert 96161 to subscribe to the Truckee Police Department and Truckee Fire Protection District. 

Both CodeRED and Nixle Everbridge are high-speed mass notification systems designed to notify residents in the event of an emergency. Emergency alerts are one of many communication tools utilized by local government in the event of an emergency, and testing these systems is an important part of emergency planning. 

These tools are not a guaranteed source of information, and residents should be prepared and remain situationally aware.

Learn more at ReadyNevadaCounty.org

Placer County Placed on State COVID-19 Monitoring List

Placer County has been placed on the State’s COVID-19 Monitoring List as of July 9. If the County remains on the list for three consecutive days, some businesses will be required by the State to close indoor operations for a minimum of three weeks.

The following businesses are urged to prepare for a shift to outdoor operations:
Dine-in restaurants
Wineries and Tasting Rooms
Family Entertainment Centers
Movie Theaters
Zoos and Museums
Cardrooms

In addition, all brewpubs, breweries, bars, and pubs would need to close, both indoors and outdoors, unless they offer sit down, dine-in meals.

More information on the Placer County Facebook page.

NC Public Health: Help Limit Spread of COVID-19 Over Holiday Weekend


Summer is officially here in Nevada County. As residents prepare to celebrate the Fourth of July weekend, Nevada County Public Health reminds residents to follow best practices for reducing the spread of COVID-19, including washing hands regularly, practicing physical distancing of at least six feet, staying home if you’re feeling sick, wearing a face covering (required in public), disinfecting high-touch surfaces and practicing good hygiene.

Gatherings with family and friends have long been a part of traditional Fourth of July celebrations, but this year is different. Gatherings between people from different households are still not allowed under the statewide Stay-at-Home Order.

 “As we see the number of cases go up steadily in our community and statewide, we ask that everyone take these restrictions on gatherings seriously,” said Director of Nevada County Public Health Jill Blake. “Our ability to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Nevada County relies on everyone doing their part and following current public health guidance.”

Since June 1, the county has seen the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases nearly triple, from 42 at the beginning of the month to 116 on June 30. Both sides of the county have seen significant increases, which mirrors surges in adjacent counties and at the state and national level. 

Most of the new cases in Nevada County come directly from informal gatherings between different households that are still not allowed. The county urges residents to do their part to prevent the spread of COVID-19 by not gathering with people outside their household this holiday weekend and following state and local public health guidance.

Masks Make a Difference Fact Sheet in English (Nevada County Public Health): https://www.mynevadacounty.com/DocumentCenter/View/35029/COVID-Face-Coverings-Flyer

Masks Make a Difference Fact Sheet in Spanish (Nevada County Public Health):  https://www.mynevadacounty.com/DocumentCenter/View/35054/COVID-Face-Coverings-Flyer-Espanol

Guidance on Gatherings (Nevada County Public Health): https://www.mynevadacounty.com/DocumentCenter/View/35052/COVID-Gatherings-Flyer

NC Public Health: Help Limit Spread of COVID-19 Over Holiday Weekend

Summer is officially here in Nevada County. As residents prepare to celebrate the Fourth of July weekend, Nevada County Public Health reminds residents to follow best practices for reducing the spread of COVID-19, including washing hands regularly, practicing physical distancing of at least six feet, staying home if you’re feeling sick, wearing a face covering (required in public), disinfecting high-touch surfaces and practicing good hygiene.

Gatherings with family and friends have long been a part of traditional Fourth of July celebrations, but this year is different. Gatherings between people from different households are still not allowed under the statewide Stay-at-Home Order.

 “As we see the number of cases go up steadily in our community and statewide, we ask that everyone take these restrictions on gatherings seriously,” said Director of Nevada County Public Health Jill Blake. “Our ability to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Nevada County relies on everyone doing their part and following current public health guidance.”

Since June 1, the county has seen the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases nearly triple, from 42 at the beginning of the month to 116 on June 30. Both sides of the county have seen significant increases, which mirrors surges in adjacent counties and at the state and national level. 

Most of the new cases in Nevada County come directly from informal gatherings between different households that are still not allowed. The county urges residents to do their part to prevent the spread of COVID-19 by not gathering with people outside their household this holiday weekend and following state and local public health guidance.

Masks Make a Difference Fact Sheet in English (Nevada County Public Health): https://www.mynevadacounty.com/DocumentCenter/View/35029/COVID-Face-Coverings-Flyer

Masks Make a Difference Fact Sheet in Spanish (Nevada County Public Health):  https://www.mynevadacounty.com/DocumentCenter/View/35054/COVID-Face-Coverings-Flyer-Espanol

Guidance on Gatherings (Nevada County Public Health): https://www.mynevadacounty.com/DocumentCenter/View/35052/COVID-Gatherings-Flyer

New Public Health Guidance Requires Californians to Wear Face Coverings

The California Department of Public Health today released updated guidance that requires Californians to wear a face covering in high-risk settings. Today’s guidance mandates the use of cloth face coverings by the general public statewide when outside the home, with limited exceptions. 

Californians must wear face coverings when they are in the situations listed below:

  • Inside of, or in line to enter, any indoor public space;
  • Obtaining services from the healthcare sector in settings including, but not limited to, a hospital, pharmacy, medical clinic, laboratory, physician or dental office, veterinary clinic, or blood bank;
  • Waiting for or riding on public transportation or paratransit or while in a taxi, private car service, or ride-sharing vehicle;
  • Engaged in work, whether at the workplace or performing work off-site, when:
  • Interacting in-person with any member of the public; 
  • Working in any space visited by members of the public, regardless of whether anyone from the public is present at the time; 
  • Working in any space where food is prepared or packaged for sale or distribution to others; 
  • Working in or walking through common areas, such as hallways, stairways, elevators, and parking facilities; 
  • In any room or enclosed area where other people (except for members of the person’s own household or residence) are present when unable to physically distance.

The following individuals are exempt from wearing a face covering:

  • Children aged two and under;
  • Persons with a medical, mental health, or developmental disability that prevents wearing a face covering;
  • Persons who are hearing impaired, or communicating with a person who is hearing impaired, where the ability to see the mouth is essential for communication;
  • Persons for whom wearing a face covering would create a risk to the person related to their work, as determined by local, state, or federal regulators or workplace safety guidelines. 
  • Persons who are obtaining a service involving the nose or face for which temporary removal of the face covering is necessary to perform the service;
  • Persons who are seated at a restaurant or other establishment that offers food or beverage service, while they are eating or drinking, provided that they are able to maintain a distance of at least six feet away from persons who are not members of the same household or residence;
  • Persons who are engaged in outdoor work or recreation such as swimming, walking, hiking, bicycling, or running, when alone or with household members, and when they are able to maintain a distance of at least six feet from others;
  • Persons who are incarcerated. Prisons and jails, as part of their mitigation plans, will have specific guidance on the wearing of face coverings of masks for both inmates and staff.”

“Science shows that face coverings and masks work,” said Governor Gavin Newsom. “They are critical to keeping those who are around you safe, keeping businesses open and restarting our economy.”

Governor Newsom also addressed why he took this action now. “Simply put, we are seeing too many people with faces uncovered – putting at risk the real progress we have made in fighting the disease. California’s strategy to restart the economy and get people back to work will only be successful if people act safely and follow health recommendations. That means wearing a face covering, washing your hands and practicing physical distancing.”

More information is available on the CDPH website.

New Public Health Guidance Requires Californians to Wear Face Coverings

The California Department of Public Health today released updated guidance that requires Californians to wear a face covering in high-risk settings. Today’s guidance mandates the use of cloth face coverings by the general public statewide when outside the home, with limited exceptions. 

Californians must wear face coverings when they are in the situations listed below:

  • Inside of, or in line to enter, any indoor public space;
  • Obtaining services from the healthcare sector in settings including, but not limited to, a hospital, pharmacy, medical clinic, laboratory, physician or dental office, veterinary clinic, or blood bank;
  • Waiting for or riding on public transportation or paratransit or while in a taxi, private car service, or ride-sharing vehicle;
  • Engaged in work, whether at the workplace or performing work off-site, when:
  • Interacting in-person with any member of the public; 
  • Working in any space visited by members of the public, regardless of whether anyone from the public is present at the time; 
  • Working in any space where food is prepared or packaged for sale or distribution to others; 
  • Working in or walking through common areas, such as hallways, stairways, elevators, and parking facilities; 
  • In any room or enclosed area where other people (except for members of the person’s own household or residence) are present when unable to physically distance.

The following individuals are exempt from wearing a face covering:

  • Children aged two and under;
  • Persons with a medical, mental health, or developmental disability that prevents wearing a face covering;
  • Persons who are hearing impaired, or communicating with a person who is hearing impaired, where the ability to see the mouth is essential for communication;
  • Persons for whom wearing a face covering would create a risk to the person related to their work, as determined by local, state, or federal regulators or workplace safety guidelines. 
  • Persons who are obtaining a service involving the nose or face for which temporary removal of the face covering is necessary to perform the service;
  • Persons who are seated at a restaurant or other establishment that offers food or beverage service, while they are eating or drinking, provided that they are able to maintain a distance of at least six feet away from persons who are not members of the same household or residence;
  • Persons who are engaged in outdoor work or recreation such as swimming, walking, hiking, bicycling, or running, when alone or with household members, and when they are able to maintain a distance of at least six feet from others;
  • Persons who are incarcerated. Prisons and jails, as part of their mitigation plans, will have specific guidance on the wearing of face coverings of masks for both inmates and staff.”

“Science shows that face coverings and masks work,” said Governor Gavin Newsom. “They are critical to keeping those who are around you safe, keeping businesses open and restarting our economy.”

Governor Newsom also addressed why he took this action now. “Simply put, we are seeing too many people with faces uncovered – putting at risk the real progress we have made in fighting the disease. California’s strategy to restart the economy and get people back to work will only be successful if people act safely and follow health recommendations. That means wearing a face covering, washing your hands and practicing physical distancing.”

More information is available on the CDPH website.

New Public Health Guidance Requires Californians to Wear Face Coverings

The California Department of Public Health today released updated guidance that requires Californians to wear a face covering in high-risk settings. Today’s guidance mandates the use of cloth face coverings by the general public statewide when outside the home, with limited exceptions. 

Californians must wear face coverings when they are in the situations listed below:

  • Inside of, or in line to enter, any indoor public space;
  • Obtaining services from the healthcare sector in settings including, but not limited to, a hospital, pharmacy, medical clinic, laboratory, physician or dental office, veterinary clinic, or blood bank;
  • Waiting for or riding on public transportation or paratransit or while in a taxi, private car service, or ride-sharing vehicle;
  • Engaged in work, whether at the workplace or performing work off-site, when:
  • Interacting in-person with any member of the public; 
  • Working in any space visited by members of the public, regardless of whether anyone from the public is present at the time; 
  • Working in any space where food is prepared or packaged for sale or distribution to others; 
  • Working in or walking through common areas, such as hallways, stairways, elevators, and parking facilities; 
  • In any room or enclosed area where other people (except for members of the person’s own household or residence) are present when unable to physically distance.

The following individuals are exempt from wearing a face covering:

  • Children aged two and under;
  • Persons with a medical, mental health, or developmental disability that prevents wearing a face covering;
  • Persons who are hearing impaired, or communicating with a person who is hearing impaired, where the ability to see the mouth is essential for communication;
  • Persons for whom wearing a face covering would create a risk to the person related to their work, as determined by local, state, or federal regulators or workplace safety guidelines. 
  • Persons who are obtaining a service involving the nose or face for which temporary removal of the face covering is necessary to perform the service;
  • Persons who are seated at a restaurant or other establishment that offers food or beverage service, while they are eating or drinking, provided that they are able to maintain a distance of at least six feet away from persons who are not members of the same household or residence;
  • Persons who are engaged in outdoor work or recreation such as swimming, walking, hiking, bicycling, or running, when alone or with household members, and when they are able to maintain a distance of at least six feet from others;
  • Persons who are incarcerated. Prisons and jails, as part of their mitigation plans, will have specific guidance on the wearing of face coverings of masks for both inmates and staff.”

“Science shows that face coverings and masks work,” said Governor Gavin Newsom. “They are critical to keeping those who are around you safe, keeping businesses open and restarting our economy.”

Governor Newsom also addressed why he took this action now. “Simply put, we are seeing too many people with faces uncovered – putting at risk the real progress we have made in fighting the disease. California’s strategy to restart the economy and get people back to work will only be successful if people act safely and follow health recommendations. That means wearing a face covering, washing your hands and practicing physical distancing.”

More information is available on the CDPH website.

Nevada County COVID-19 Testing Site Updates – Grass Valley and Truckee

The state launched 80 OptumServe testing sites throughout California, collaborating with county leaders to identify appropriate testing sites with a focus on underserved communities. Nevada County was successful in getting two of these free COVID-19 testing sites located within the County, one in Grass Valley and one newly located in Truckee.  

Increased testing is crucial to give us a better understanding of the true prevalence of COVID-19 in our community, and to help us mitigate the spread of the virus especially in asymptomatic individuals who may not know they are sick. Testing is key to our ability to respond quickly and contain new outbreaks. If we do not utilize the testing sites, it is possible that the State will move this important resource to another community, which will not only increase our risk of COVID-19 spread, but will also set back efforts to safely re-open businesses.

An appointment is required in order to be tested, but same day appointments are possible. OptumServe’s simple process asks that you register and select an appointment time, which will generate a patient registration number. Please have this number as well as your ID with you at the time of your appointment.

ANYONE can get tested, regardless of symptoms, profession, or insurance. While your insurance may be billed if you have it, there are no out of pocket costs. Do your part and make your appointment to get tested today at lhi.care/covidtesting or call 888-634-1123, and help spread the word with your customers, families, and friends.

Grass Valley Testing Site

Drive-through COVID-19 testing is now available for everyone at the Grass Valley Veterans Memorial Building! With our new drive-through capabilities, getting tested is now even safer and more convenient.

If you’re feeling unwell when you arrive to the testing site, you will be asked to stay in your car so staff can come out and take your test from your vehicle. If you’re feeling well but want to get tested anyway, you’ll have the choice to stay in your car to be tested or park and walk-in on the right-side-ramp entrance.

The testing site at the Grass Valley Veteran’s Hall is open Tuesday through Saturday from 7 AM to 7 PM. Days of operations are subject to change. Please see the OptumServe site for up to date site hours.

Truckee Testing Site

As of June 8th, the free COVID-19 OptumServe testing site has moved from Kings Beach to Truckee and is now located at 10990 Donner Pass Road.  We are hopeful that this new site location will increase accessibility for more residents in the region and will increase our testing numbers. The Truckee testing site is open Monday through Friday from 7 AM to 7 PM. Days of operations are subject to change. Please see the OptumServe site for up to date site hours.

Remember, for additional coronavirus information or for a link to OptumServe’s testing site, you can visit the County’s coronavirus website at www.mynevadacounty.com/coronavirus. You can also watch this video outlining the testing process.

Nevada County COVID-19 Testing Site Updates – Grass Valley and Truckee

The state launched 80 OptumServe testing sites throughout California, collaborating with county leaders to identify appropriate testing sites with a focus on underserved communities. Nevada County was successful in getting two of these free COVID-19 testing sites located within the County, one in Grass Valley and one newly located in Truckee.  

Increased testing is crucial to give us a better understanding of the true prevalence of COVID-19 in our community, and to help us mitigate the spread of the virus especially in asymptomatic individuals who may not know they are sick. Testing is key to our ability to respond quickly and contain new outbreaks. If we do not utilize the testing sites, it is possible that the State will move this important resource to another community, which will not only increase our risk of COVID-19 spread, but will also set back efforts to safely re-open businesses.

An appointment is required in order to be tested, but same day appointments are possible. OptumServe’s simple process asks that you register and select an appointment time, which will generate a patient registration number. Please have this number as well as your ID with you at the time of your appointment.

ANYONE can get tested, regardless of symptoms, profession, or insurance. While your insurance may be billed if you have it, there are no out of pocket costs. Do your part and make your appointment to get tested today at lhi.care/covidtesting or call 888-634-1123, and help spread the word with your customers, families, and friends.

Grass Valley Testing Site

Drive-through COVID-19 testing is now available for everyone at the Grass Valley Veterans Memorial Building! With our new drive-through capabilities, getting tested is now even safer and more convenient.

If you’re feeling unwell when you arrive to the testing site, you will be asked to stay in your car so staff can come out and take your test from your vehicle. If you’re feeling well but want to get tested anyway, you’ll have the choice to stay in your car to be tested or park and walk-in on the right-side-ramp entrance.

The testing site at the Grass Valley Veteran’s Hall is open Tuesday through Saturday from 7 AM to 7 PM. Days of operations are subject to change. Please see the OptumServe site for up to date site hours.

Truckee Testing Site

As of June 8th, the free COVID-19 OptumServe testing site has moved from Kings Beach to Truckee and is now located at 10990 Donner Pass Road.  We are hopeful that this new site location will increase accessibility for more residents in the region and will increase our testing numbers. The Truckee testing site is open Monday through Friday from 7 AM to 7 PM. Days of operations are subject to change. Please see the OptumServe site for up to date site hours.

Remember, for additional coronavirus information or for a link to OptumServe’s testing site, you can visit the County’s coronavirus website at www.mynevadacounty.com/coronavirus. You can also watch this video outlining the testing process.

Stage 3 Businesses May Reopen with Modifications on June 12th

Nevada County Public Health has updated Nevada County’s Reopen Plan for the safe reopening of 12 new industry sectors in Nevada County beginning on June 12th, which includes statewide guidance and guidance for variance counties like Nevada County. Updated FAQs are also available on the statewide Stay-at-Home order and reopening Nevada County.

Nevada County Public Health Officer Dr. Ken Cutler has rescinded the local Short-Term Rental and Lodging order effective tomorrow, June 12th, to align with the State’s recommended guidance for reopening these industries safely. All hotels, lodging and short-term rentals must abide by the State’s guidance for this industry.

New sectors/activities that can open IF they can follow the state guidance:

  • Movie theaters
  • Family entertainment centers
  • Wineries and bars
  • Zoos, museums, galleries, aquariums
  • Gyms and fitness centers
  • Hotels and short term rentals for tourism and individual travel
  • Card rooms
  • Campgrounds and outdoor recreation
  • Movie, film, tv production
  • Professional sports (w/o live audiences)

What’s still closed statewide:

  • Personal services, like nail salons, massage, body waxing and tattoo parlors
  • Public events and gatherings, like live audience sports and live theater
  • Team sports that involve contact
  • Convention centers
  • Theme parks and festivals
  • Higher education (in person)
  • Indoor playgrounds, like bounce centers, ball pits and laser tag
  • Saunas and steam rooms

Nevada County is hosting a follow-up Stage 3 Business Guidance Workshop on Tuesday, June 16th. Local Businesses May Submit Reopening Questions to COVID19Recovery@co.nevada.ca.us.

Stage 3 Businesses May Reopen with Modifications on June 12th

Nevada County Public Health has updated Nevada County’s Reopen Plan for the safe reopening of 12 new industry sectors in Nevada County beginning on June 12th, which includes statewide guidance and guidance for variance counties like Nevada County. Updated FAQs are also available on the statewide Stay-at-Home order and reopening Nevada County.

Nevada County Public Health Officer Dr. Ken Cutler has rescinded the local Short-Term Rental and Lodging order effective tomorrow, June 12th, to align with the State’s recommended guidance for reopening these industries safely. All hotels, lodging and short-term rentals must abide by the State’s guidance for this industry.

New sectors/activities that can open IF they can follow the state guidance:

  • Movie theaters
  • Family entertainment centers
  • Wineries and bars
  • Zoos, museums, galleries, aquariums
  • Gyms and fitness centers
  • Hotels and short term rentals for tourism and individual travel
  • Card rooms
  • Campgrounds and outdoor recreation
  • Movie, film, tv production
  • Professional sports (w/o live audiences)

What’s still closed statewide:

  • Personal services, like nail salons, massage, body waxing and tattoo parlors
  • Public events and gatherings, like live audience sports and live theater
  • Team sports that involve contact
  • Convention centers
  • Theme parks and festivals
  • Higher education (in person)
  • Indoor playgrounds, like bounce centers, ball pits and laser tag
  • Saunas and steam rooms

Nevada County is hosting a follow-up Stage 3 Business Guidance Workshop on Tuesday, June 16th. Local Businesses May Submit Reopening Questions to COVID19Recovery@co.nevada.ca.us.

Additional Businesses may Reopen in Placer County on Friday

Following the release of additional guidance from the California Department of Public Health last Friday, additional businesses and activities from Stages 2 and 3 may reopen in Placer County as soon as June 12, after implementing guidance and developing safety plans to address COVID-19.

Businesses and activities eligible for reopening include:

  • Schools and school-based programs
  • Day camps
  • Hotels, lodging and short-term rentals (for tourism and individual travel)
  • Campgrounds, RV parks and outdoor recreation
  • Professional sports without live audiences
  • Music, film and television production
  • Gyms and fitness centers, including pools
  • Family entertainment centers
  • Zoos, museums, galleries and aquariums
  • Bars and wineries; and
  • Cardrooms and racetracks

Businesses in these sectors should carefully read the guidance issued by the state available on the Reopen Placer website and develop corresponding safety plans. Once those safety plans are completed, eligible businesses may reopen on or after June 12 without further approval of the Placer County Health Officer. Guidance was also issued for casinos, which are under the jurisdiction of sovereign nations, and childcare guidance was updated.

“While more businesses will come back online at the end of this week, I implore county residents to continue following practices that can slow the rate of infection, such as regular handwashing, staying six feet apart from others and wearing face coverings in public settings where physical distancing is not possible,” said Placer County Health Officer Dr. Aimee Sisson. “Personal responsibility is a hallmark of Placer County, and our individual actions will go a long way to determining how well we are able to reduce the spread of coronavirus in our community.”

The state has not released guidance for a handful of other businesses still closed, such as nail salons, tattoo parlors and body waxing; indoor playgrounds such as bounce centers, ball pits and laser tag; live theater; saunas and steam rooms; nightclubs; concert venues; festivals; theme parks; and higher education. Nor has guidance been provided for youth sports. If the state has not yet released guidance for a sector, then that sector cannot yet be reopened at the local level. Officials in counties with attestations determine when specific sectors of their economy can reopen if state guidance has been posted. It is up to the local jurisdiction to make decisions regarding reopening specific sectors based upon the epidemiology and readiness of the county.

Placer County’s COVID-19 cases have increased recently, including a 35% rise in the past week. The 7-day average testing positivity rate has increased from 1% to 3% as of the latest reporting period, indicating that increased cases are not merely the result of increased testing, but this rate remains below a threshold of 8% that has been identified by the California Department of Public Health. Placer County hospitals continue to have adequate capacity, including available critical care beds, ventilators and personal protective equipment. Placer County’s other data have not met any of the triggers outlined in the local attestation, nor the state’s new monitoring indicators, as shown in today’s health officer presentation.

The vast majority of new cases have been in people younger than 65. There have been a few clusters of cases – several in one family related to international travel, several in fast-food workers as well as cases in the Auburn Jail. In an environment of community transmission, it is difficult to pinpoint where and how someone became infected with a virus that has an incubation period of up to two weeks and that can be transmitted by people without symptoms. For most cases, a precise infection source cannot be determined.

“We knew before reopening began that cases of COVID-19 would increase as the county reopened. We made clear in our attestation in May that our goals were to avoid overwhelming the health care system and to protect vulnerable populations,” said Sisson. “My team will watch the case rate metric closely in the coming days and weeks, as it is cause for concern. Should Placer County’s data not meet the state-defined cutoff, I will engage our Board of Supervisors and the California Department of Public Health to identify what is driving increases and identify action steps for addressing issues that impact areas of concern.”

While county health officials continue to monitor data, the Board of Supervisors today directed County Executive Officer Todd Leopold to prepare a letter to the governor and state health officials requesting guidance be released for the remaining businesses in stage 3 that don’t have permission to open at the end of this week.

“We are hopeful the governor will provide us with the guidance we are requesting,” said District 5 Supervisor Cindy Gustafson. “Our county leadership has demonstrated prudence and wisdom throughout this crisis, and has complied with the state’s guidance throughout the stay-at-home order and reopening.”

Youth sports stirred many members of the community to provide public comment during today’s discussion. Most advocated on behalf of allowing the outdoor activity that is currently not permitted by the governor.

“It’s very frustrating to tell our parents their kids cannot go outdoors and play soccer and baseball or participate in organized sports. We are taking precautions to protect our vulnerable populations, but we also need to protect the health of our young people and being cooped up inside all day long is not healthy for anyone,” said Board Chair Bonnie Gore. “Our residents need to contact the governor to let him know our kids need to be playing outside. He needs to hear from all of us.”

Nevada County Moving into Stage 3 Reopening as Soon as June 12th

On Friday, June 5th, the California Department of Public Health released reopening guidance documents for 12 additional Stage 3 business sectors. Under the statewide order and with local Public Health Officer approval, these businesses will be able to reopen with modifications in place to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 as soon as June 12th. Nevada County Public Health immediately began to review the guidance to determine how these requirements fit into our local community. They will continue a careful review to provide science-based recommendations or requirements for both a safe and quick reopening specific to Nevada County.

“It is good news that we will be able to reopen more businesses and move into Stage 3 reopening as early as next Friday,” said Nevada County Public Health Director Jill Blake. “We will be reviewing the State guidance this weekend and considering how we can best protect our community by moving safely into Stage 3 reopening.  However, with this good news, we also saw a significant spike in Nevada County cases this week. We need to continue to be diligent with reopening safely, and that will truly require a community-wide effort.”

Nevada County Moving into Stage 3 Reopening as Soon as June 12th

On Friday, June 5th, the California Department of Public Health released reopening guidance documents for 12 additional Stage 3 business sectors. Under the statewide order and with local Public Health Officer approval, these businesses will be able to reopen with modifications in place to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 as soon as June 12th. Nevada County Public Health immediately began to review the guidance to determine how these requirements fit into our local community. They will continue a careful review to provide science-based recommendations or requirements for both a safe and quick reopening specific to Nevada County.

“It is good news that we will be able to reopen more businesses and move into Stage 3 reopening as early as next Friday,” said Nevada County Public Health Director Jill Blake. “We will be reviewing the State guidance this weekend and considering how we can best protect our community by moving safely into Stage 3 reopening.  However, with this good news, we also saw a significant spike in Nevada County cases this week. We need to continue to be diligent with reopening safely, and that will truly require a community-wide effort.”

Placer Receives Clarification on Stage Three Reopening

Friday’s California Governor news conference has generated some questions about counties’ current ability to move forward on reopening at their own pace. We’ve just received written confirmation from California Department of Public Health‘s health officer that, under the statewide order, a business sector is allowed to reopen only after the State has posted its guidance online at www.covid19.ca.gov AND the local health officer approves the sector to resume. The following guidance from their letter applies to counties like Placer with a variance to move more quickly through Stage 2 of the State’s reopening roadmap: “A variance county can elect to open a given sector so long as (1) the State has issued guidance for how a given sector can reopen and (2) the local health officer has provided approval for that sector to open in that locality. If the state has not yet released guidance for a sector, then that sector cannot yet be opened.”

As one of the first counties to have its attestation approved, Placer County has moved both quickly and carefully to safely reopen. We’ve reopened as many business sectors as allowed by the State order, and our Board of Supervisors has formally requested permission to move further into Stage 3 of the State’s roadmap. We’ve created our own materials for future-stage businesses to prepare for reopening based on the state guidance issued to date: https://www.placer.ca.gov/reopen/planahead

Guidance for sectors that may currently reopen in Placer County can be found at: https://www.placer.ca.gov/reopen/guidance
And visit the ‘Can I Reopen?’ page for more information: https://www.placer.ca.gov/reopen/canireopen

State Releases COVID-19 Guidance for Political Protest Gatherings

Protesting or demonstrating is one of our fundamental rights and a way to express ourselves. However, due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, it is important to do it safely. To this end, the State has updated their guidelines to include political protest gatherings. It is strongly recommended that those exercising their right to engage in political expression, should utilize alternative channels, such as the many online and broadcasting platforms available in the digital age, in place of in-person gatherings. 

However, state public health directives do not prohibit in-person protests as long as:

  • attendance is limited to 25% of the relevant area’s maximum occupancy, as defined by the relevant local permitting authority or other relevant authority, or a maximum of 100 attendees, whichever is lower
  • physical distancing of six feet between persons or groups of persons from different households is maintained at all times.

Failure to maintain adequate physical distancing may result in an order to disperse or other enforcement action. Face coverings are strongly recommended.

Participants must maintain a physical distance of six feet from any uniformed peace officers and other public safety personnel present, unless otherwise directed, and follow all other requirements and directives imposed by local health officers and law enforcement, or other applicable authorities. This limitation on attendance will be reviewed at least once every 21 days, beginning May 25, 2020. This review will assess the impacts of these imposed limits on public health and provide further direction as part of a phased-in restoration of gatherings that implicate the First Amendment.

State Releases COVID-19 Guidance for Political Protest Gatherings

Protesting or demonstrating is one of our fundamental rights and a way to express ourselves. However, due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, it is important to do it safely. To this end, the State has updated their guidelines to include political protest gatherings. It is strongly recommended that those exercising their right to engage in political expression, should utilize alternative channels, such as the many online and broadcasting platforms available in the digital age, in place of in-person gatherings. 

However, state public health directives do not prohibit in-person protests as long as:

  • attendance is limited to 25% of the relevant area’s maximum occupancy, as defined by the relevant local permitting authority or other relevant authority, or a maximum of 100 attendees, whichever is lower
  • physical distancing of six feet between persons or groups of persons from different households is maintained at all times.

Failure to maintain adequate physical distancing may result in an order to disperse or other enforcement action. Face coverings are strongly recommended.

Participants must maintain a physical distance of six feet from any uniformed peace officers and other public safety personnel present, unless otherwise directed, and follow all other requirements and directives imposed by local health officers and law enforcement, or other applicable authorities. This limitation on attendance will be reviewed at least once every 21 days, beginning May 25, 2020. This review will assess the impacts of these imposed limits on public health and provide further direction as part of a phased-in restoration of gatherings that implicate the First Amendment.

COVID-19 Cases Increases to 48 – Testing Available to All Residents

Nevada County received notification of six new COVID-19 cases today; five of the residents are closely connected with a common exposure, and the sixth was a person who had no symptoms. All are adults residing in Eastern Nevada County. All have been notified and are isolating. In addition, household contacts are in quarantine. The case investigation was initiated by Nevada County Public Health Department today and remains open.Case investigation and contact tracing are core public health functions used to connect with people who are COVID-19 positive so that we can help them get medical care and figure out who they might have exposed without knowing it, so those individuals can be contacted, too.

“Although our hospitals are prepared for a surge in COVID-19 cases, we have case investigation and contact tracing process systems in place and more testing available, COVID-19 remains a risk to our community,” said Public Health Director Jill Blake. “Those who are more at risk for serious illness due to COVID-19 such as the elderly or those with underlying health conditions should continue to stay at home as much as they can as well as limit their exposure to others.”

Testing Available to All Nevada County Residents

Two OptumServe testing sites are available in Grass Valley and Kings Beach. Symptomatic or asymptomatic can be tested. People who get tested at these sites will not be charged for the test; for those with insurance, your insurance will be billed, and for those with no insurance, the State will pay for your test. Increased testing allows for a better understanding of COVID-19 in our community. Even without symptoms, testing of all individuals can help identify those who are asymptomatic and may want to take extra precautions to protect others in the community.

You must pre-register and schedule an appointment at https://www.lhi.care/covidtesting or call 888-634-1123. Please have your appointment authorization number when you arrive at the testing site. Tests can also still be conducted by doctors’ offices too, but you do not need your physician’s approval to be tested at the OptumServe site.

COVID-19 Cases Increases to 48 – Testing Available to All Residents

Nevada County received notification of six new COVID-19 cases today; five of the residents are closely connected with a common exposure, and the sixth was a person who had no symptoms. All are adults residing in Eastern Nevada County. All have been notified and are isolating. In addition, household contacts are in quarantine. The case investigation was initiated by Nevada County Public Health Department today and remains open.Case investigation and contact tracing are core public health functions used to connect with people who are COVID-19 positive so that we can help them get medical care and figure out who they might have exposed without knowing it, so those individuals can be contacted, too.

“Although our hospitals are prepared for a surge in COVID-19 cases, we have case investigation and contact tracing process systems in place and more testing available, COVID-19 remains a risk to our community,” said Public Health Director Jill Blake. “Those who are more at risk for serious illness due to COVID-19 such as the elderly or those with underlying health conditions should continue to stay at home as much as they can as well as limit their exposure to others.”

Testing Available to All Nevada County Residents

Two OptumServe testing sites are available in Grass Valley and Kings Beach. Symptomatic or asymptomatic can be tested. People who get tested at these sites will not be charged for the test; for those with insurance, your insurance will be billed, and for those with no insurance, the State will pay for your test. Increased testing allows for a better understanding of COVID-19 in our community. Even without symptoms, testing of all individuals can help identify those who are asymptomatic and may want to take extra precautions to protect others in the community.

You must pre-register and schedule an appointment at https://www.lhi.care/covidtesting or call 888-634-1123. Please have your appointment authorization number when you arrive at the testing site. Tests can also still be conducted by doctors’ offices too, but you do not need your physician’s approval to be tested at the OptumServe site.