California Now Cleared to Offer Pfizer-BioNTech Booster Shots

With the Western States Scientific Safety Review Workgroup review and approval of the CDC’s recommendations regarding COVID-19 vaccine boosters, California is now cleared to follow the federal recommendations that certain individuals can receive a booster dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. The booster dose is intended to provide enhanced protection to people who may be at greater risk of serious illness due to COVID-19.

At this time, booster doses are only available to those who have been fully vaccinated with the Pfizer vaccine. Boosters should be administered at least six months after an individual has received their last dose of the Pfizer vaccine.

 According to the CDPH, the following individuals SHOULD receive a booster dose:

People who MAY CONSIDER receiving a booster dose based on their individual benefits and risks include:

  • People age 18 through 49 years with underlying medical conditions; and
  • People age 18 through 64 who are at increased risk of exposure to COVID-19 due to their occupation or institutional setting.

The Pfizer booster cannot be administered to those who have been vaccinated with the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccines. Officials are still awaiting information on boosters for these vaccines.

Pfizer booster shots are currently available at local and regional pharmacies and through health care providers. Some primary care physicians and health clinics may contact their eligible patients to schedule booster doses. There are currently no plans for a large-scale booster vaccination clinic locally.

For more information on how to schedule a Pfizer booster, go to MyNevadaCounty.com/GetVaccinated or MyTurn.ca.gov. Those who have questions about eligibility or would like assistance scheduling an appointment can call 211 Connecting Point at 1-833-DIAL211.

As pharmacies and health care providers administer Pfizer booster doses, the Nevada County Public Health department will continue to focus its effort on outreach to unvaccinated individuals who encounter barriers to vaccine access.

“Our primary responsibility is reaching residents who haven’t had their first dose yet. As we saw in this recent surge, unvaccinated individuals are far more likely to be hospitalized or die of COVID-19,” said Nevada County Public Health Director Jill Blake. “Our REACH Team is working closely with local organizations and businesses to ensure that everyone who wants to be vaccinated can get their shot.”

While over 114,000 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been administered to Nevada County residents, 35% of eligible residents remain unvaccinated. “The solution to ending this pandemic is through immunizations,” said Public Health Officer Dr. Scott Kellermann. “If you haven’t had your first dose yet, it’s not too late. We’re ready when you are.”

All California residents age 12 and over are eligible for free COVID-19 vaccine. For more information on where to get your vaccination, including a Pfizer booster shot, go to MyNevadaCounty.com/GetVaccinated or MyTurn.ca.gov.

California Now Cleared to Offer Pfizer-BioNTech Booster Shots

With the Western States Scientific Safety Review Workgroup review and approval of the CDC’s recommendations regarding COVID-19 vaccine boosters, California is now cleared to follow the federal recommendations that certain individuals can receive a booster dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. The booster dose is intended to provide enhanced protection to people who may be at greater risk of serious illness due to COVID-19.

At this time, booster doses are only available to those who have been fully vaccinated with the Pfizer vaccine. Boosters should be administered at least six months after an individual has received their last dose of the Pfizer vaccine.

 According to the CDPH, the following individuals SHOULD receive a booster dose:

People who MAY CONSIDER receiving a booster dose based on their individual benefits and risks include:

  • People age 18 through 49 years with underlying medical conditions; and
  • People age 18 through 64 who are at increased risk of exposure to COVID-19 due to their occupation or institutional setting.

The Pfizer booster cannot be administered to those who have been vaccinated with the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccines. Officials are still awaiting information on boosters for these vaccines.

Pfizer booster shots are currently available at local and regional pharmacies and through health care providers. Some primary care physicians and health clinics may contact their eligible patients to schedule booster doses. There are currently no plans for a large-scale booster vaccination clinic locally.

For more information on how to schedule a Pfizer booster, go to MyNevadaCounty.com/GetVaccinated or MyTurn.ca.gov. Those who have questions about eligibility or would like assistance scheduling an appointment can call 211 Connecting Point at 1-833-DIAL211.

As pharmacies and health care providers administer Pfizer booster doses, the Nevada County Public Health department will continue to focus its effort on outreach to unvaccinated individuals who encounter barriers to vaccine access.

“Our primary responsibility is reaching residents who haven’t had their first dose yet. As we saw in this recent surge, unvaccinated individuals are far more likely to be hospitalized or die of COVID-19,” said Nevada County Public Health Director Jill Blake. “Our REACH Team is working closely with local organizations and businesses to ensure that everyone who wants to be vaccinated can get their shot.”

While over 114,000 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been administered to Nevada County residents, 35% of eligible residents remain unvaccinated. “The solution to ending this pandemic is through immunizations,” said Public Health Officer Dr. Scott Kellermann. “If you haven’t had your first dose yet, it’s not too late. We’re ready when you are.”

All California residents age 12 and over are eligible for free COVID-19 vaccine. For more information on where to get your vaccination, including a Pfizer booster shot, go to MyNevadaCounty.com/GetVaccinated or MyTurn.ca.gov.

Amended Health Order Sets New Requirements for Events, Masks

Nevada County Public Health Officer Dr. Scott Kellermann has amended his August 18th order on face coverings to include further mandates for crowded outdoor settings and large events. The order becomes effective at 12:01 a.m. on August 27, 2021.

In addition to last week’s requirements for face coverings indoors, the amended order:

  • Requires that everyone, regardless of vaccination status, wear face coverings outdoors in crowded settings.
  • Prohibits indoor and outdoor gatherings or events where 2,500 or more people will be in attendance, until further notice.
  • Requires that events with 500 attendees or more develop and implement a plan to verify vaccination status, or proof of a negative test preferably within the 24 hours of the event but no longer than 72 hours prior to the event.

Nevada County is experiencing an unprecedented number of COVID-19 cases admitted to its two hospitals. As of August 24, 2021, Nevada County’s case rate was 49.1 cases per day per 100,000 and the test positivity rate was 12.0%, one of the highest in California. 

The hospitals in Nevada County are at capacity, and all hospitals in the region are reaching their inpatient limit. There is very limited capacity for transferring patients within the region. Regional emergency departments have been overwhelmed with patients seeking diagnosis and care for COVID-19 to the point where those with other emergency conditions are finding delayed care or having to go elsewhere for help.  

Rising case rates, increasing test positivity, and the high numbers of hospitalizations are largely due to the predominance of the highly infectious Delta variant, which has been labeled as “younger, sicker, quicker.” The Delta variant is highly contagious and may have increased the risk of hospitalization compared to the original virus. 

Large gatherings will lead to further spread of COVID-19, creating an additional burden for the medical system in Nevada County.

“The steps we’re taking today are the limit the spread of the virus in our community,” Kellermann said of the amended order. “The Delta variant is highly transmissible, but there are simple ways to protect ourselves and those we love. Mask up indoors and out, avoid gatherings, and if you can, get vaccinated as soon as possible.”

Read the full order here.

Placer County Public Health Issues New COVID-19 Health Warning

The Delta surge has resulted in record numbers of COVID-related hospitalizations this week and is leaving our local hospitals with less room to absorb more patients requiring hospitalization. Hospitals in Placer County are providing critical care in areas not typically designed for that purpose, report a high level of acuity in their patients, and are experiencing strains on their workforce. COVID patients occupy nearly one third of licensed beds, a higher share relative to hospitals in other communities.

Beyond hospitalizations, cases in school settings are rising too among students and staff, resulting in increasing numbers of classroom outbreaks that, in some cases, have led to the temporary cancellation of in-person instruction. School-related cases were uncommon and largely isolated with previous COVID-19 variants, yet early signs point to more students and staff who are turning up positive as a result of a COVID exposure. 

To preserve critical infrastructure that serves all, including hospitals and schools, Placer County Public Health is advising residents regardless of vaccination status to use high-quality masks while in all indoor settings to protect against the highly infectious Delta variant.

“Our individual actions during this Delta surge are impacting everyone, including those seeking health care or in-person instruction,” said Interim Health Officer Dr. Rob Oldham. “Placer County Public Health stands behind organizations who take precautions to support our community’s efforts to preserve key infrastructure such as implementing universal indoor masking, which is much less disruptive than other restrictions experienced during the pandemic.” 

To provide a sufficient layer of protection, residents are also advised to use higher quality masks, like a surgical or KN95 mask. Higher quality masks were largely in short supply during the beginning of the pandemic but are now more readily available at local drug stores or online.

For those who are 12 and older and unvaccinated, talk to your doctor right away about questions you have about COVID-19 vaccines. Most patients currently hospitalized locally for COVID-19, including those in the intensive care unit, have not received a COVID-19 vaccination. While vaccination may not fully prevent infection, it’s one of the best tools we have to reduce the risk of severe illness and hospitalization. Please visit myturn.ca.gov to schedule your appointment today.

Nevada County Public Health Officer Issues Order on Face Coverings Indoors

Today, Nevada County Public Health Officer Dr. Scott Kellermann issued an order requiring all individuals, regardless of vaccination status, to wear face coverings when indoors in public settings and businesses. The order also strongly recommends that everyone, regardless of vaccination status, wear face coverings outdoors in crowded settings. The order goes into effect at 12:01 am on Friday, August 20th.

Additionally, the order clarifies that all schools, private or public, and settings where students from more than one household gather for purposes of education, must follow the requirements of the California Department of Public Health for wearing face coverings for students, staff, volunteers, and visitors.

The Health Officer’s order comes on the heels of soaring case rates and hospitalizations connected to the highly infectious Delta variant, which has been labeled “younger, sicker, quicker” in comparison to the original virus. Case rates have risen over elevenfold–from 5.5. to 61.2 per 100,000 residents–since the statewide transition to Beyond the Blueprint on June 15, 2021. Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital has been experiencing the highest volume of patients admitted since the beginning of the pandemic.

Though the three vaccines authorized for use in the U.S. have been shown to be safe and effective, over 30% of Nevada County residents remain unvaccinated.

“With the rapid increase in COVID-19 transmission, we must use the tools we know to be effective in slowing the spread of the virus. Masking is the least disruptive and most immediately impactful additional measure we can take,” Kellermann said.

Kellermann recommended that all individuals, especially those who are unvaccinated or at higher risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19, take personal measures to reduce risk in addition to masking.

See the full text of the Order

COVID-19 Cases Surge in Nevada County as Delta Variant Takes Hold

With 443 cases last week, Nevada County is experiencing the largest surge of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations since the beginning of the pandemic. Cases have increased by 1200% since the week of July 1st.

Similar dramatic increases are being seen across the state. The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) recently reported that California’s statewide case rate more than quadrupled from a low in May. The huge increase in infections is already taxing the healthcare system, with local and regional hospitals heavily impacted.

“There has been a substantial increase in COVID-19 patients coming to the hospital, which have resulted in more admissions,” said Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital President Dr. Brian Evans. “Our winter peak was 15 hospitalized patients, and we have now seen numbers as high as 29 in the last few days. The number of admissions fluctuates on a daily, and even hourly basis. The substantial majority of admissions for COVID are unvaccinated individuals. Nationally, unvaccinated patients make up well over 90 percent of admissions. At Sierra Nevada, we are having a similar experience. If you haven’t received your COVID vaccination, I strongly encourage you to do so.”  

According to the State’s COVID-19 hospitalization data, there are currently 25 COVID patients admitted to local hospitals. Evans said that over 90% of those admitted to Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital are unvaccinated.

As cases continue to surge throughout State, local officials are urging Nevada County residents to take precautions. “We would be beyond the Purple Tier if we were not Beyond the Blueprint,” said Health and Human Services Director Ryan Gruver, referring to the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, which state officials abandoned in mid-June.

 “The dismantling of the tier system happened to correspond with the introduction of the highly contagious Delta variant,” said Nevada County Public Health Director Jill Blake. “Unfortunately, this may have given people a false sense of security in terms of disease transmission risk.”

Surge in COVID Cases is Linked to Delta Variant

According to state Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly, the Delta variant (B.1.617.2) is up to 60% more infectious than the Alpha strain, and many more times more infectious than the original COVID-19 strain.

Public Health officials first confirmed the appearance in Nevada County of this highly transmissible variant from samples taken in early June. Over 80% of current COVID-19 cases statewide are confirmed to be from the Delta variant.

 “This variant is so contagious that people who are fully vaccinated can still get the virus,” Trochet said.  “And those who are unvaccinated are at much greater risk.” According to the CDPH, COVID-19 case rates are 600% higher in unvaccinated people than those who are vaccinated.

Breakthrough Cases in Nevada County

Breakthrough cases currently constitute approximately 20% of new weekly COVID-19 cases. Public Health officials consider any infection in a fully vaccinated person to be a ‘breakthrough’ case.

Breakthrough cases in fully vaccinated individuals are not uncommon, given that the vaccines are not 100% effective. Age and underlying health conditions can contribute to a lesser immune protective response to the vaccine. With 28% of Nevada County residents over the age of 65, our community is uniquely vulnerable to breakthrough cases.

While such cases are expected, officials are concerned by recent evidence that those who are vaccinated may be able to spread the virus, even if they have no symptoms.

Vaccines Continue to Be the Best Way to Prevent Serious Illness and Death

All three available vaccines continue to provide a high level of protection against the Delta variant. In fact, the vast majority of new cases are among the unvaccinated. Out of 100,000 Californians, 33 unvaccinated individuals will contract COVID-19 each day, compared to 7 vaccinated individuals, according to the CDPH.

While vaccines have been effective against the Delta variant, the virus continues to mutate as more people get sick. “If we allow people to continue to get infected, we will get a variant that escapes the effectiveness of vaccines,” Dr. Trochet said. “If everybody had gotten the vaccine when it was first available, we would not be here now. But it’s not too late to prevent this from getting worse.”

As families prepare to send kids back to school in the coming weeks, this is particularly important to protect children under 12 who are not currently able to receive a vaccine.

To schedule a vaccination, online at go to MyTurn.ca.gov or call 1-833-422-4255.

Tips to Stay Safe and Limit the Spread

With the recent rise in cases, the Nevada County Public Health Department issued a recommendation on July 29th encouraging vaccinated individuals to wear a mask in indoor public spaces. Both the CDC and the CDPH released similar recommendations the same week.

In California, unvaccinated individuals are required to wear a mask in indoor public places like stores, restaurants, and theaters. Everyone is required to wear a mask in certain public settings, including on public transit and in schools. To learn more about the State of California’s mask requirements, go to https://covid19.ca.gov/masks-and-ppe.

Local health officials are also encouraging residents to rethink attending large gatherings where people may be unvaccinated and unmasked. “I would think long and hard about attending large gatherings,” said Deputy Public Health Officer Dr. Glennah Trochet. “There are certain groups who are at higher risk, vaccinated or not. It would be better to not to go than to be exposed,” Trochet added.

Those who do decide to attend crowded events should wear a mask to protect themselves and others.

More Information

To schedule a vaccination, online at go to MyTurn.ca.gov or call 1-833-422-4255. For updates and information on COVID-19, go to MyNevadaCounty.com/Coronavirus

COVID-19 Cases Surge in Nevada County as Delta Variant Takes Hold

With 443 cases last week, Nevada County is experiencing the largest surge of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations since the beginning of the pandemic. Cases have increased by 1200% since the week of July 1st.

Similar dramatic increases are being seen across the state. The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) recently reported that California’s statewide case rate more than quadrupled from a low in May. The huge increase in infections is already taxing the healthcare system, with local and regional hospitals heavily impacted.

“There has been a substantial increase in COVID-19 patients coming to the hospital, which have resulted in more admissions,” said Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital President Dr. Brian Evans. “Our winter peak was 15 hospitalized patients, and we have now seen numbers as high as 29 in the last few days. The number of admissions fluctuates on a daily, and even hourly basis. The substantial majority of admissions for COVID are unvaccinated individuals. Nationally, unvaccinated patients make up well over 90 percent of admissions. At Sierra Nevada, we are having a similar experience. If you haven’t received your COVID vaccination, I strongly encourage you to do so.”  

According to the State’s COVID-19 hospitalization data, there are currently 25 COVID patients admitted to local hospitals. Evans said that over 90% of those admitted to Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital are unvaccinated.

As cases continue to surge throughout State, local officials are urging Nevada County residents to take precautions. “We would be beyond the Purple Tier if we were not Beyond the Blueprint,” said Health and Human Services Director Ryan Gruver, referring to the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, which state officials abandoned in mid-June.

 “The dismantling of the tier system happened to correspond with the introduction of the highly contagious Delta variant,” said Nevada County Public Health Director Jill Blake. “Unfortunately, this may have given people a false sense of security in terms of disease transmission risk.”

Surge in COVID Cases is Linked to Delta Variant

According to state Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly, the Delta variant (B.1.617.2) is up to 60% more infectious than the Alpha strain, and many more times more infectious than the original COVID-19 strain.

Public Health officials first confirmed the appearance in Nevada County of this highly transmissible variant from samples taken in early June. Over 80% of current COVID-19 cases statewide are confirmed to be from the Delta variant.

 “This variant is so contagious that people who are fully vaccinated can still get the virus,” Trochet said.  “And those who are unvaccinated are at much greater risk.” According to the CDPH, COVID-19 case rates are 600% higher in unvaccinated people than those who are vaccinated.

Breakthrough Cases in Nevada County

Breakthrough cases currently constitute approximately 20% of new weekly COVID-19 cases. Public Health officials consider any infection in a fully vaccinated person to be a ‘breakthrough’ case.

Breakthrough cases in fully vaccinated individuals are not uncommon, given that the vaccines are not 100% effective. Age and underlying health conditions can contribute to a lesser immune protective response to the vaccine. With 28% of Nevada County residents over the age of 65, our community is uniquely vulnerable to breakthrough cases.

While such cases are expected, officials are concerned by recent evidence that those who are vaccinated may be able to spread the virus, even if they have no symptoms.

Vaccines Continue to Be the Best Way to Prevent Serious Illness and Death

All three available vaccines continue to provide a high level of protection against the Delta variant. In fact, the vast majority of new cases are among the unvaccinated. Out of 100,000 Californians, 33 unvaccinated individuals will contract COVID-19 each day, compared to 7 vaccinated individuals, according to the CDPH.

While vaccines have been effective against the Delta variant, the virus continues to mutate as more people get sick. “If we allow people to continue to get infected, we will get a variant that escapes the effectiveness of vaccines,” Dr. Trochet said. “If everybody had gotten the vaccine when it was first available, we would not be here now. But it’s not too late to prevent this from getting worse.”

As families prepare to send kids back to school in the coming weeks, this is particularly important to protect children under 12 who are not currently able to receive a vaccine.

To schedule a vaccination, online at go to MyTurn.ca.gov or call 1-833-422-4255.

Tips to Stay Safe and Limit the Spread

With the recent rise in cases, the Nevada County Public Health Department issued a recommendation on July 29th encouraging vaccinated individuals to wear a mask in indoor public spaces. Both the CDC and the CDPH released similar recommendations the same week.

In California, unvaccinated individuals are required to wear a mask in indoor public places like stores, restaurants, and theaters. Everyone is required to wear a mask in certain public settings, including on public transit and in schools. To learn more about the State of California’s mask requirements, go to https://covid19.ca.gov/masks-and-ppe.

Local health officials are also encouraging residents to rethink attending large gatherings where people may be unvaccinated and unmasked. “I would think long and hard about attending large gatherings,” said Deputy Public Health Officer Dr. Glennah Trochet. “There are certain groups who are at higher risk, vaccinated or not. It would be better to not to go than to be exposed,” Trochet added.

Those who do decide to attend crowded events should wear a mask to protect themselves and others.

More Information

To schedule a vaccination, online at go to MyTurn.ca.gov or call 1-833-422-4255. For updates and information on COVID-19, go to MyNevadaCounty.com/Coronavirus

State Orders Some Placer County Businesses to Close Beginning July 12th

In response to the increasing spread of COVID-19, State Public Health Officer Dr. Sonia Angell today issued an order for several businesses in Placer County to either close or eliminate indoor operations starting Sunday, July 12. The State had indicated previously that any California county that remains on the monitoring list for three days will be ordered to draw back its reopening efforts.

According to the State order, the following businesses must shift to outdoor operations or close effective on Sunday for a minimum of three weeks.

  • Dine-in restaurants
  • Wineries and Tasting Rooms
  • Family Entertainment Centers
  • Movie Theaters
  • Zoos and Museums
  • Cardrooms

The State order allows businesses to modify operations to provide services outside and encourages take-out and delivery. The state has also issued new guidance for restaurants providing outdoor dining, take-out, drive-through, and delivery. All industry or sector guidance documents that have been issued by the State to date, including all infectious control measures outlined in those guidance documents, apply in outdoor settings and must be adhered to, according to the state order.

In addition, all brewpubs, breweries, bars, and pubs must close, both indoors and outdoors, unless they are offering sit down, dine-in meals as described in earlier state guidance.

Drivers of increased disease transmission in Placer County include large households where staying away from others while ill is difficult, community and extended family gatherings, and indoor work environments where physical distancing is difficult. The rising number of cases of COVID-19 in Placer County as well as neighboring Sacramento County is in turn driving an increase in hospitalizations.

“I understand how frustrating this is for our local businesses, and my hope is that our whole community will pull together and promote the personal precautions that can help reverse these disease trends,” said Placer County Health Officer Dr. Aimee Sisson. “Please wash your hands, maintain physical distance, wear a face covering in public, and do not gather with non-household members.”

State Orders Some Placer County Businesses to Close Beginning July 12th

In response to the increasing spread of COVID-19, State Public Health Officer Dr. Sonia Angell today issued an order for several businesses in Placer County to either close or eliminate indoor operations starting Sunday, July 12. The State had indicated previously that any California county that remains on the monitoring list for three days will be ordered to draw back its reopening efforts.

According to the State order, the following businesses must shift to outdoor operations or close effective on Sunday for a minimum of three weeks.

  • Dine-in restaurants
  • Wineries and Tasting Rooms
  • Family Entertainment Centers
  • Movie Theaters
  • Zoos and Museums
  • Cardrooms

The State order allows businesses to modify operations to provide services outside and encourages take-out and delivery. The state has also issued new guidance for restaurants providing outdoor dining, take-out, drive-through, and delivery. All industry or sector guidance documents that have been issued by the State to date, including all infectious control measures outlined in those guidance documents, apply in outdoor settings and must be adhered to, according to the state order.

In addition, all brewpubs, breweries, bars, and pubs must close, both indoors and outdoors, unless they are offering sit down, dine-in meals as described in earlier state guidance.

Drivers of increased disease transmission in Placer County include large households where staying away from others while ill is difficult, community and extended family gatherings, and indoor work environments where physical distancing is difficult. The rising number of cases of COVID-19 in Placer County as well as neighboring Sacramento County is in turn driving an increase in hospitalizations.

“I understand how frustrating this is for our local businesses, and my hope is that our whole community will pull together and promote the personal precautions that can help reverse these disease trends,” said Placer County Health Officer Dr. Aimee Sisson. “Please wash your hands, maintain physical distance, wear a face covering in public, and do not gather with non-household members.”

Placer Community Foundation Grant Supports 211 Placer COVID-19 Helpline

Connecting Point announced today the award of a $10,000 grant from the Placer Community Foundation to support the operation of the 211 Placer COVID-19 Helpline.

Placer County residents can call 2-1-1 to connect to up-to-date information on COVID-19 testing and State-issued guidance.

The Placer County COVID-19 Helpline has been in operation since the outbreak of the pandemic. Placer County’s Health and Human Services department recently transitioned operations of the general information helpline to Connecting Point, which maintains a regional 211 call center and will launch 211 Placer in July. 211 is a free, confidential, multilingual resource and information hub. 211 connects people with community programs and services through a searchable web page and 24/7 local call center.

“Connecting Point is a trusted community partner,” says Eileen Speaker, Grants Manager for Placer Community Foundation. “We are glad to support this important service through our COVID-19 Response Fund that connects Placer County residents to services and supports.”

Jeff Brown, Director of Placer County Health & Human Services remarks, “It’s a great example of partnership and collaboration to meet community needs. We’re all in this together.”

To connect to the 211 Placer COVID-19 Helpline dial 2-1-1 or 1-833-DIAL211, text your zip code to 898211 (your text plan’s rate will apply) or connect to resources online at 211Placer.org.

About Connecting Point

Connecting Point is a public agency dedicated to providing programs and services that promote the health and independence of the people of our community.

About Placer Community Foundation

Placer Community Foundation is a public charity established to assist donors in building an enduring source of charitable funds to meet the changing needs and interests of the community.

Volunteers Needed for Green Waste Collection Events

Nevada County Fire Safe Council is seeking volunteers for the 2020 Free Residential Green Waste Collection days.

With 3 sites and 18 collection days, volunteers have many opportunities to choose from. Sites are in Grass ValleyPenn Valley, and Alta Sierra. Volunteers can sign up for shifts at different sites on different days if they like.

Volunteers at each collection site will coordinate traffic, collect participant information, track loads received using a tablet/iPad, answer questions, and perform an initial inspection to ensure invasive species (blackberry, Scotch broom, poison oak) are not in the loads of green waste.

To volunteer, visit the Volunteer Hub website or call 2-1-1 (or 1-833-DIAL211).

Details

Each shift will be from 9am-3pm. The collections will take place on Sundays, Mondays, and Tuesdays of each of the following weeks:

  • May 17, 18, 19
  • May 24, 25, 26
  • May 31, June 1, 2
  • June 7, 8, 9
  • June 14, 15, 16
  • June 21, 22, 23

Sign up for as many time slots as you are willing to take.

QUALIFICATIONS & TRAINING:

  • Must be 18 or older. Can be 16 or 17 if attending with an adult.
  • Special measures will be put in place to ensure this is a no-contact event, keeping volunteers safe from potential exposure to the COVID-19 virus. This includes training delivered via video conference, or via YouTube. Completion of a short quiz will be required after the training, as well.
  • We will train you on the use of the tablets/iPads to check-in residents and show you how to spot invasive species in loads of green waste.
  • Fire Safe Council requires both liability and media releases (permission to use pictures of you doing the work)

WHAT TO BRING:

A smile, a water flask, a camp chair if you need to sit down, and perhaps some sunscreen and a hat. We’ll provide everything else you need that day.

BACKGROUND:

Cost for green waste removal remains a significant obstacle for property owners when it comes to fuels reduction. In response to this obstacle, the Fire Safe Council of Nevada County (FSCNC) hosted a 2019 Green Waste Event, resulting in removal of over 500 tons of green waste from Western Nevada County.

Based on the enthusiastic response by the community FSCNC will continue this event in 2020, partnering with the Nevada County Office of Emergency Services to provide this valuable service to residents for a total of 18 days in May and June, in order to further reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire in the community.

The collection and processing of this green waste will also reduce the number of burn piles in the county, which can irritate the lungs of residents who already face respiratory challenges. If their respiratory system is already compromised, contracting COVID-19 may be even more of a threat to them.

The objective this year is to expand upon an already successful event, continuing to provide a cost-effective way for residents of Western Nevada County to dispose of their residential green waste at three convenient locations, instead of creating a burn pile to eliminate that waste.

Thank you for your commitment to making Nevada County safer from wildfire, and to helping those with compromised respiratory systems get through this difficult time. Stay safe, and well.

Business Impact Survey

As the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic surface, the Grass Valley Downtown Association and the Greater Grass Valley Chamber of Commerce are continually collecting data and information from businesses on the local impact. They have put together a COVID-19 Impact Survey to gather information.

If you are a local business owner, please take a moment to complete one of the following surveys. The information you provide will be critical in the continued response in assisting the business community.

Survey for Nevada City Businesses

Survey for Grass Valley Businesses

The data collected from these surveys will be used to communicate to state legislators, press, and to local elected officials on the types of resources needed by businesses, artists, and individuals. 

All information will be reported in general terms and individual business information will remain confidential.

Thank you for your participation!

New Website Promotes Local Businesses Offering Essential Services

When the COVID-19 crisis caused California to issue a Shelter in Place Order, some Nevada County residents quickly saw a need for information on local food pickup and delivery options. As businesses changed their service models, these folks took to the web to document the changes and spread the word. A month into the crisis, a group of these innovators have come together to pool resources and create a one-stop shop for COVID-19 business information.

The new website, NevadaCounty.Community-Need.com is your central online resource to find Western Nevada County businesses offering products and services during California’s Shelter in Place order.

The website has detailed information on essential businesses that are offering in-store shopping, in-store pick-up, curbside pick-up, and delivery. In addition, local businesses offering services and products online can create listings on how to book and buy from them directly.

“As folks are receiving their stimulus checks, it’s a great time to make those essential purchases from our local businesses,” says Meri Mohr, Alta Sierra resident, and contributor. Robin Galvan-Davies, CEO of the Greater Grass Valley Chamber of Commerce notes, “As, during the PSPS events last fall, we are collaborating to support our small business owners and entrepreneurs during this difficult time.”

“We are focused on getting this information out to people fast,” says Marni Marshall, Director of the Grass Valley Downtown Association, “so we are tracking feedback and will continue to develop the interface and the content.” The new site fills an important gap in information during the COVID-19 crisis. “Our 211 program connects community members to a wide array of low or no-cost services provided by local nonprofits and government agencies. This list gives us an additional tool in our toolkit to help people connect to local businesses that are providing essential services,” says Connecting Point communications manager Heather Heckler. “We appreciate the collaborative effort.”

This web directory is the result of a collaboration between the Nevada City Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Grass Valley Chamber of Commerce, the Grass Valley Downtown Association, 211 Connecting Point, and the purveyors and patrons who contributed to Nevada County’s Curbside for Covid list, born from the Virtual Shop & Support Local Facebook Group. These organizations were receiving numerous requests for information, and many community members contributed to early development efforts, including Meri Mohr, Andreas Groos, Gary & Lisa Frankel, and Todd Wahoske and Jesse Locks of NC GV FOOD.

Local IT Services firm R&B Communications continues to develop the site pro-bono as a gift to the community. “We’ve been helping many businesses make changes to their websites and service strategies through shelter-at-home, and we’re honored to be able to use our team’s skills to support our community,” said R&B’s Chief Business Development Officer, Jacob Griscom. Volunteers administer the site, approving & validating submissions, and providing user support. Email info.nevadacounty@community-needs.com for more information.

Dial-a-Ride Service Launches in W. Nevada County

Seniors in Western Nevada County have a new transportation option. Starting April 22nd, Nevada County Transit Services is launching a Senior Dial-a-Ride service. Dial-a-Ride covers the same service area and schedule as the Gold Country Lift and is available to anyone age 65 and over. The cost is $4.00 for a one-way trip.
 
To request a ride, call Gold Country Lift at 530-271-RIDE (7433). First time passengers must show proof of age and submit a simple application at pick-up. A PDF of the Dial-A-Ride application is available at www.goldcountrystage.com
 
Typical hours of operation are Monday through Friday 6:30 am to 7:30 pm and Saturday 7:30 am to 5:00 pm. Current operating hours are reduced due to the Stay at Home order for COVID-19.
 
Call Gold Country Lift at 530-271-RIDE (7433) or Transit Services at 530-477-0103 for more information.

Nevada County Public Health Reports the First COVID-19 Related Death

Nevada County Public Health is reporting the first Nevada County death related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The person was an elderly Eastern Nevada County resident who had underlying health conditions and previously tested positive for the coronavirus.

“During this time, our thoughts are with the family, friends and loved ones of the deceased,” said Dr. Ken Cutler, Nevada County Public Health Officer. “This is a tragic reminder of the seriousness of COVID-19. To slow the spread of this virus, we all need to stay inside as much as possible and severely limit person to person interactions, as hard as that is.”

Out of respect for the privacy of the family, Nevada County Public Health is not sharing further details. For additional information on the statewide Stay-at-Home Order and recommendations to keep you and your family safer, please visit Nevada County’s coronavirus webpage at www.mynevadacounty.com/coronavirus

FAQs on Governor’s Shelter in Place Order

The County of Nevada released answers to a large list of Frequently Asked Questions related to Governor Newsom’s Shelter in Place Order (Executive Order N-33-20).

The order requires all Californians to “shelter-in-place” by remaining at home or at their place of residence, except as necessary to obtain food, care for a relative or friend, get necessary healthcare, or go to an essential job.

A sample of the questions includes:

WHAT’S CLOSED?

• Dine-in restaurants
• Bars and nightclubs
• Entertainment venues
• Gyms and fitness studios
• Non-essential services

WHAT CAN’T I DO?

• You cannot engage in group activities in person with others.
• You cannot have dinner parties. You cannot invite friends over to your home to hang out.
• You cannot go to bars.
• You cannot go to a nail salon or get your hair cut by a stylist or barber.
• You cannot go shopping for non-essential goods.
• You cannot take unnecessary trips on public transport or in your car or motorbike.

IS THIS MANDATORY OR IS IT JUST GUIDANCE?

It is mandatory. This Order is a legal Order issued under the authority of California law. You are
required to comply.

It is critical for everyone to follow the Order to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and protect
themselves, their loved ones, friends, neighbors and the whole community.

All persons, businesses, and other entities are required to comply if they do not fall within the
exemptions that are specified in the Order.

Read the full document or go to www.mynevadacounty.com/2924/Coronavirus to learn more.

FAQs on Governor’s Shelter in Place Order

The County of Nevada released answers to a large list of Frequently Asked Questions related to Governor Newsom’s Shelter in Place Order (Executive Order N-33-20).

The order requires all Californians to “shelter-in-place” by remaining at home or at their place of residence, except as necessary to obtain food, care for a relative or friend, get necessary healthcare, or go to an essential job.

A sample of the questions includes:

WHAT’S CLOSED?

• Dine-in restaurants
• Bars and nightclubs
• Entertainment venues
• Gyms and fitness studios
• Non-essential services

WHAT CAN’T I DO?

• You cannot engage in group activities in person with others.
• You cannot have dinner parties. You cannot invite friends over to your home to hang out.
• You cannot go to bars.
• You cannot go to a nail salon or get your hair cut by a stylist or barber.
• You cannot go shopping for non-essential goods.
• You cannot take unnecessary trips on public transport or in your car or motorbike.

IS THIS MANDATORY OR IS IT JUST GUIDANCE?

It is mandatory. This Order is a legal Order issued under the authority of California law. You are
required to comply.

It is critical for everyone to follow the Order to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and protect
themselves, their loved ones, friends, neighbors and the whole community.

All persons, businesses, and other entities are required to comply if they do not fall within the
exemptions that are specified in the Order.

Read the full document or go to www.mynevadacounty.com/2924/Coronavirus to learn more.

Gearing Up for Census 2020

Nevada County Counts logoEvery 10 years, the U.S. Census Bureau attempts to count every person living in the United States. No matter your age, race, gender, sexual orientation, or citizenship status–if you live in the United States, YOU COUNT.

Why the Census Matters

The Census is about more than just counting people. It has repercussions that will last a decade. Census data is used to fund roads, health services, and disaster planning and response. It also determines funding for essential safety net programs like MediCal, CalFresh, CalWORKs, WIC, and Section 8 Housing Vouchers, and many more.

Did we mention political representation?

There is a lot on the line.

Making Nevada County Count

Over the last six months, leaders throughout our community have come together to ensure a complete count in Nevada County. With a focus on populations that have been undercounted in the past, the coalition includes organizations that serve children, seniors, people with disabilities, veterans, and Latinx and LGBTQ+ folks. Together we’re creating safe spaces to learn about and participate in Census 2020.
Unlike past counts, the 2020 Census will be the first to rely heavily on online responses. For those of us without internet access, this can be a major barrier. We are working to set up sites throughout the county where you can complete the Census online. You can also respond by phone or by mail.

Coming Soon

Census Day is April 1st, but you will be able to complete your Census form beginning in mid-March. Keep an eye on your mailbox for your invitation to complete the Census online. In the meantime, check out the Nevada County Counts website to sign up for Census updates or learn more about why the Census matters for our community.

Get Involved

If you work for a organization that serves “hard-to-count” communities, you may be eligible for a Census Mini-Grant. Learn more about mini-grants here.
To learn more about the 2020 Census go to www.NevadaCountyCounts.org or call us at 211.