Ages & Stages: Social-Emotional Development at 2 Months

Ages & Stages Graphic

Raising a little person is beautiful, fun, and (sometimes) terrifying. It’s also pretty predictable.

Researchers have been studying the stages of child development for years and are able to provide a fairly detailed roadmap of what’s ahead developmentally. Each month, we will share with you some practical information on what to expect from your new baby and some activities you can do together to encourage her healthy development.

Social-Emotional Development

Your child is developing many different skills as she grows, including communication skills, motor skills, social skills, and problem-solving skills. Today we’re focusing on your infant’s social-emotional development.

Social-emotional development is all about your child’s ability to experience and express feelings. Social-emotional strengths are the foundation for all other learning and development to occur throughout your child’s life.

What to Expect at 2 Months

  • Your baby is really smiling at you and others now
  • Your baby may use different cries to tell you when she is hungry, uncomfortable, or sick
  • Your baby “talks” to you with noises and gurgles
  • Your baby likes to be with people and is becoming more interactive with you
  • Your baby likes to play with her fingers, hands, feet, and toes
  • Sometimes your baby will be fussy only because he wants your attention
  • Your baby can recognize familiar people by their voices

Tips for 2 Months

Use a positive tone with your baby to let her know that you love and care for her. Making your child feel safe, secure, nurtured, and loved will help her grow and learn.

Social-Emotional Activities to Try with Your 2-Month Old

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More activities to try with your 2-month old. Click on the image to download a PDF of the activity sheet.
  • It is never too early to read books to your baby. Choose simple board books at first and talk about the pictures. Cuddle up close.
  • Take your time when you are giving your baby a bath or changing his diapers. Gently massage his feet and/or belly. Talk to the baby or sing during these one-on-one times.
  • Talk to your baby about what she is doing, seeing, hearing, and feeling. Say, “I am changing your diaper. You will like being nice and dry.”
  • Spend time holding your baby and use this time to show her things around the house or yard. Name things and let the baby touch safe, simple objects (like plastic cups or big wooden spoons).
  • Find more activities here.

Remember, you are the most important person in your child’s life!

To learn more about your child’s developmental stages, give us a call at 211 (just dial 211 from any local phone) or check out the Ages & Stages Questionnaires online

Source: ASQ:SE-2 User’s Guide, Squires, Bricker, & Twombly